Dairy

DairyDairy is the leading agricultural industry in New York State, and the state ranks third in the country for milk production. Our five counties in southwestern New York form an especially vibrant dairy region, with over 680 dairy farms of many different sizes and production systems. 

The SWNY Dairy, Livestock, and Field Crops Program assists dairy farmers by providing business management, forage production, and dairy management support. Our Dairy Management Specialist offers assistance with calf and heifer management, reproductive management, dairy records analysis, herd health, nutrition, and facilities. 





Relevant Events

WEBINAR - Automated Milking Systems Efficiency: Balancing Focus on Individual Cows and System Optimization

May 8, 2024

Stockmanship and Stewardship 2024

October 25, 2024
Hamburg, NY

Are your calves eating enough starter at weaning? by Camila Lage

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 9, 2024
Are your calves eating enough starter at weaning? by Camila Lage

Calf-rearing programs on farms have undergone significant changes in recent years. Traditionally, these programs aimed to reduce raising costs of replacement heifers by promoting early starter feed intake, providing calves with an average of 1.2 lb./d of milk solids (~ 4 quarts of whole milk daily), and weaning them at 4-6 weeks of age. However, research has shown that higher nutrition plans during the pre-weaning phase benefit animal health and welfare and can potentially boost future milk production (Soberon et al., 2012). Consequently, the industry has increased milk/milk replacer allowances to an average of at least 1.7 lb./d (~ 6 quarts of whole milk daily) and extended the pre-weaning phase to at least eight weeks of age. While this is a better practice regarding calf health and welfare, it presents a new challenge: preparing calves to transition from liquid to solid diets. This task requires careful planning and execution.


Lessons learned from SWNY calves' transfer of passive immunity project

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: March 26, 2024
Lessons learned from SWNY calves' transfer of passive immunity project

After almost four months of "stabbing" calf necks to collect blood samples to evaluate the transfer of passive immunity in 10 farms across SWNY, it is time to reflect on the lessons learned. First, I would like to thank all the farms that accepted participation in the project. I appreciate the time we spent together, during which I had the opportunity to meet you for the first time and to get to know you and your farm better. 


Northeast Goat and Sheep Dairy Development Grant is Now Accepting Applications!

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 26, 2024
Northeast Goat and Sheep Dairy Development Grant is Now Accepting Applications!

The Northeast Dairy Business Innovation Center is now accepting applications for their Goat and Sheep Dairy Development Grants, which can be used for both individual business projects and sector enhancement projects. The deadline to apply is June 6.


Do not let cow comfort stand between you and extra milk pounds.

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 21, 2024
Do not let cow comfort stand between you and extra milk pounds.

Once, I heard that the cow has three main jobs: get milked, eat and drink, and lie down to chew her cud, and that a farmer's job is to guarantee her the conditions to do these things well. In scientific terms,  "cow comfort" is to provide cows with physical and emotional wellness, including the ability to walk and exercise freely without risk of injury, gain access to sufficient food and water to satiate their hunger and thirst, seek shelter from weather and climate extremes, and, perhaps most importantly, achieve adequate rest (Cook, 2020).


Lessons learned from "The Psychology of Money" that also apply to dairy industry

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: January 16, 2024
Lessons learned from

As one of my New Year's resolutions, I am trying to learn more about finances. I am fascinated by human behavior, and because of that, a friend of mine suggested I read the Psychology of Money by Morgan Housel. 

The book explores the behavioral aspects of personal finance and emphasizes the impact of individual history on financial decisions. The author explores different historical facts, like war and recessions, and how they impact the mindset of each generation. Moreover, it elaborates on how hard it is to forecast the future to know how our present decisions will impact our lives and businesses. Despite being challenging, the author believes certain behaviors can put us in the best position possible while making long-term decisions. 

While reading the book, I couldn't help but draw a parallel between the lessons from an investing perspective and the farming world. I believe the book's insights offer valuable perspectives and recommend it to someone looking for a new book. 


Reporting Winter Storm Damage - It's Important!

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: January 16, 2024
Reporting Winter Storm Damage - It's Important!

Winter's here, and with that comes high winds, heavy snow loads, power outages, and damages that negatively impact your farm business. Katelyn Walley shares the importance of documenting damages and reporting them here, along with key contact information.


Cattle Injection Tips

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: December 14, 2023
Cattle Injection Tips

Giving injections of vitamins, vaccinations, dewormers, and antibiotics is a scientific process. Following label instructions, giving injections in the "injection triangle", and opting for sub-cutaneous (sub Q) injections reduces the risk of muscle lesions and trim loss.


New PRO-DAIRY and CCE Dairy Specialists Podcast - Cornell Cow Convos

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 30, 2023
New PRO-DAIRY and CCE Dairy Specialists Podcast - Cornell Cow Convos

Cornell Cow Convos

This monthly podcast series led by PRO-DAIRY and CCE Dairy Specialists features current, new and emerging topics of interest to the dairy industry right now. New episodes are released on the last Thursday of the month. Our first few episodes include discussions on preventative healthcare for cows, the trend of beef on dairy, what to look forward to in the new year for dairy, and socially grouping or pair-housing calves. This series also features specially selected interviews with dairy farmers and industry experts and invites suggestions from our listeners for future topics.


The 5Q`S of Colostrum Management

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 30, 2023
The 5Q`S of Colostrum Management

Evaluating colostrum management is essential to the heifer program. Colostrum audits can be an alternative to routine monitoring transfer of passive immunity if labor is a constraint to the farm. A snapshot of herd immune status can indicate the farm's current success in colostrum management and suggest whether or not procedures need to be reviewed.


Why all the fuss about pair housing?

Last Modified: November 30, 2023
Why all the fuss about pair housing?

Most pre-weaned dairy calves in the United States and Canada are housed individually. However, current research shows benefits to raising calves in well-managed pairs or small groups with full social contact. Housing calves with at least one companion can improve animal welfare, calf growth, and consumer perception. Although the impact on calf health is less clear, many of the benefits of pair housing are promising for the vitality and sustainability of the dairy industry. A growing number of producers have found when raising dairy calves, two heads (or more) are better than one. 


Confined Spaces: Hazards of Manure Gases

Last Modified: November 13, 2023
Confined Spaces: Hazards of Manure Gases

While new manure handling systems are more efficient and reduce manual labor, farmers and ranchers must understand the hazards associated with working in and around confined spaces where manure is stored. Keep yourself and employees safe this season by understanding the risk of manure gases!



2022 National Beef Quality Audit Results

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: October 24, 2023
2022 National Beef Quality Audit Results

Every 5 years, this audit is used to identify trends in the beef market and in beef cattle in general. It also helps the industry gain an understanding of how the implementation of the Beef Quality Assurance Program has helped reduce losses and improve quality.


Evaluating Feeding Management to Boost Cow Productivity

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: October 24, 2023
Evaluating Feeding Management to Boost Cow Productivity

Supporting dairy producers in enhancing their competitive edge is a priority for nutrition teams across the United States. Since feed costs constitute nearly half of the expenses on dairy farms, effective feeding management is crucial, particularly during elevated commodity prices. 


Please help us add contacts to our SWNY Farm Service Provider Directory!

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: October 3, 2023
Please help us add contacts to our SWNY Farm Service Provider Directory!

We want to know which categories and contacts would be most helpful to you! Please take 2 minutes to answer our anonymous survey at https://tinyurl.com/SWNYServiceProviders.


The SWNY is looking for dairy farmers to participate on a FREE research project

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: October 3, 2023
The SWNY is looking for dairy farmers to participate on a FREE research project

Are you a dairy farmer who raises calves on-site?

The SWNY team is doing a pilot experiment to understand how colostrum audits can help improve calf health, and we are looking for farms willing to participate FREE of any costs.

If you would be willing to learn more, please add your contact here so Camila Lage can contact you.

https://cornell.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bBKIKkKxY5rRWey


Transfer of passive immunity in calves: Ensuring calf health and profitability

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: September 18, 2023
Transfer of passive immunity in calves: Ensuring calf health and profitability

Camila Lage, Cornell Cooperative Extension - SWNY team & Victor Malacco, Michigan State University Extension - September 15, 2023

Calves rely heavily on colostrum for immunity. Successful transfer of passive immunity is crucial. Evaluating and improving immune transfer can reduce deaths and the number of days calves are sick, enhancing overall herd performance and profitability.


8 Ways to Reduce Somatic Cell Counts in Your Dairy Cows

Last Modified: August 7, 2023
8 Ways to Reduce Somatic Cell Counts in Your Dairy Cows

Daniela Roland, Dairy Educator, Penn State Extension Jun 28, 2023 (To access the original article, click here)

Many factors can influence SCC, from housing to lactation phase and milking protocols. With tighter margins and lower projected milk prices through the summer, focusing on management practices that can be controlled can help maintain or improve milk quality.


Summer tips to prevent winter hoof health issues - Progressive Dairy

Last Modified: August 1, 2023
Summer tips to prevent winter hoof health issues - Progressive Dairy

Warm weather provides the perfect environment for pathogen activity and hoof damage. Address the dairy's management now to prevent hoof health issues when temperatures drop.


Mastering Pasture Management with Grazing Stick: A Pro Farmer's Tool for Success

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 25, 2023
Mastering Pasture Management with Grazing Stick: A Pro Farmer's Tool for Success

The grazing stick is a valuable tool for farmers to measure pasture dry matter and estimate the available forage for their livestock. Its importance lies in providing a quick, practical, and calibrated measurement system to assess the grazing potential of a pasture. While using the grazing stick, it's essential to take multiple samples from various areas to ensure a representative value of the pasture's dry matter. This helps account for variations in the pasture's growth and grazing potential.


Interpretation of Milk Urea Nitrogen (MUN) Values - PSU Extension

Last Modified: July 19, 2023
Interpretation of Milk Urea Nitrogen (MUN) Values - PSU Extension

MUN is a breakdown product of protein and it can be used to monitor protein status of cows.


Concentrate feeding strategies for maximizing performance in AMS

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 11, 2023
Concentrate feeding strategies for maximizing performance in AMS

The advancement of automated milking systems presents an opportunity to optimize cow nutrition through tailored separate concentrate feeding.


Dairy Advancement Program receives continued funding

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 5, 2023
Dairy Advancement Program receives continued funding

Dairy Advancement Program receives continued funding

To learn more about the program and apply, click here  


Shielding grazing dairy cows from heat stress

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: June 26, 2023
Shielding grazing dairy cows from heat stress

Shielding grazing dairy cows from heat stress: effective strategies for farm management and cow welfare

Victor Malacco, Michigan State University and Camila Lage, Cornell Cooperative Extension - SWNY - June 22, 2023

Prioritizing shade, ample water access, and thoughtful management practices are crucial for protecting grazing dairy cows from heat stress, promoting their well-being and productivity during hot summer periods.

To access original article, click here


The Endemic Calf Parasite Cryptosporidium Parvum - PSU Extension

Last Modified: June 21, 2023
The Endemic Calf Parasite Cryptosporidium Parvum - PSU Extension

by Dr. Melissa Cantor and Hayley R. Springer, MS, DVM


Wildfire Smoke - What Can we do for our Livestock?

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: June 8, 2023
Wildfire Smoke - What Can we do for our Livestock?

Wildfire smoke from ongoing Canadian fires is drifting into NYS. As livestock caretakers, we can make small adjustments to our animal care, handling, and housing to reduce the effects of exposure to fine particulates and poor air quality.


Too hot to handle: Episodic heat stress can be tough on cows

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: June 5, 2023
Too hot to handle: Episodic heat stress can be tough on cows

It is still spring, but you are probably already observing some signs of discomfort in your cows since we see days in the high 80s. I always believed the Northeast weather wouldn't be so bad on cows, but that's not true. Since it takes weeks for cows to acclimate to the heat, episodic heat stress is tough for cows to handle. Investing in heat abatement is a cost-benefit, even in our "moderate climate" area.


JUNE IS DAIRY MONTH!

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: May 31, 2023
JUNE IS DAIRY MONTH!

June is an exciting time as it marks the arrival of summer, but it is also Dairy Month! Nothing better than finding a noble excuse to indulge in delicious food! This annual celebration started in 1937 and continues to date as a way to pay homage to the remarkable contributions of the dairy industry to our economy, culinary delights, and the community. 


RFID Tags - The What, Why, and How

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: May 3, 2023
RFID Tags - The What, Why, and How

RFID tags are one of the USDA-approved official identification tags for cattle, deer, and swine. This article shares some information on what these tags are, how they work, and how you can order them for free for your herd.


Summer is Almost Here: It's Time to do Heat Abatement Maintenance -PSU Extension

Last Modified: April 25, 2023
Summer is Almost Here: It's Time to do Heat Abatement Maintenance -PSU Extension

Inspect and perform maintenance on sprinklers, shade structures and cloths, fans and other ventilation systems, and water systems before the temperature rise

To access original article, click here


Why is water essential? Rethinking your cow's water access

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 5, 2023
Why is water essential? Rethinking your cow's water access

Did you know that half of Americans don't drink enough water? Despite our knowledge that water is crucial to keep our body functioning properly, our busy routines can get in the way of our hydration if we don't always have a full water bottle. The same is true for our dairy cows. With so many important things to deal with on a dairy farm, it is easy to overlook water resources when routinely evaluating farm management. Read more


Are Holstein or Jersey cows more profitable? - MSU Extension

Last Modified: March 30, 2023
Are Holstein or Jersey cows more profitable? - MSU Extension

It seems like a never-ending debate: are Jersey or Holstein cows the better choice for profitable dairy production?

To access the original article, click here 


Farm Employer Input Needed! NY Farm Labor in Transition Survey

Last Modified: March 15, 2023
Farm Employer Input Needed! NY Farm Labor in Transition Survey

New York farm employers are navigating enormous changes in farm labor markets and regulations in recent years. It is critical for farm managers and decision-makers to have accurate and up-to-date information about the farm workforce. The NY Farm Labor in Transition Survey collects farm managers' perspectives on these important issues. Please take about 20-30 minutes of your time to include your response as a NY farm employer. All data will be kept confidential, results will only be reported as group data, and no personally identifiable data will be reported. Respondents will receive a summary of the results.


New York State Dairy of Distinction Award Application Available Now

Last Modified: March 13, 2023
New York State Dairy of Distinction Award Application Available Now

Are you a New York State dairy farmer or do you know of one that is interested in applying for the distinguished Dairy of Distinction Award? Applications are now available online by visiting https://www.dairyofdistinctionawards.com/. Deadline for applications is April 15, 2023.  NY DOD program is appreciative of all its volunteers across the state that help keep this program rolling.  We are often looking for district representatives, judges and individuals to join our board of directors. Retired dairy producers and/or agribusiness are encouraged to get involved in their regions. Reach out to Marylynn with questions or interests in getting involved at mrm7@cornell.edu. If you would prefer a hardcopy of the application, please contact Alex Harrington at ash273@cornell.edu or 315.736.3394 ext.132. 


Choosing an Activity System for Your Dairy - PSU Extension

Last Modified: March 3, 2023
Choosing an Activity System for Your Dairy - PSU Extension

Activity monitoring systems can improve reproductive performance and disease detection


Dairy Technology Tuesdays Webinar Series - Recordings available!

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: March 3, 2023
Dairy Technology Tuesdays Webinar Series - Recordings available!

If Money Doesn't Grow On Trees - Maybe it Grows in Hay Fields?

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 21, 2023

If you grow, feed, or sell hay, it's important to know how to manage the green - the money, that is - to make profitable decisions. Hay production, whether it's sold off the farm or fed to livestock, is a key part of many of our farms in SWNY. Producing your own hay can diversify and improve the profitability of your farm. But, hay production can decrease your farm's profitability over time.  Not tracking financial and production records can lead to poor decision-making. 


Dairy Grazing Apprentice program - Now in partnership with the SWNY team!

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 20, 2023

The Dairy Grazing Apprenticeship (DGA) is a non-profit organization that partners with established grazing dairy farmers, universities, community-based organizations, and other stakeholders to deliver high-quality work-based training in managed-grazing dairy production in multiple states. DGA is registered with the U.S. Department of Labor-Employment and Training Administration. It provides a pathway for aspiring dairy farmers while offering experienced dairy graziers an opportunity to share their passion. Apprentices are engaged in full-time, paid employment while comprehensively trained in running a grazing dairy operation.


Use a barn that works for you and the cows - Hoards Dairyman

Last Modified: February 20, 2023
Use a barn that works for you and the cows - Hoards Dairyman

by Katelyn Allen, Associate editor 

For the original article, click here


Some Farm Business Management Reminders by Katelyn Walley-Stoll

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 13, 2023

Some reminders about the ST-125, NYS Ag Value Assessment, Separate Checking Accounts, Revisiting Your Farm Business Plan, Updating Your Balance Sheet, and Supporting Your County's Cooperative Extension Association. 


8 Things to Think About - Farm Diversification and Enterprise Analysis

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 6, 2023

When conversations about farm diversification come up, I always bring it back to our shared experiences…as dreamers, as doers, as innovators, as people who say "Well, that could have gone better". Specifically, to take this hot topic and break it down, here are my 8 considerations that (I think) are universal in conversations about farm diversification. 


Maintaining a Low Somatic Cell Count During the Winter - PSU Extension

Last Modified: February 6, 2023
Maintaining a Low Somatic Cell Count During the Winter - PSU Extension

High somatic cell count is directly correlated to poor udder cleanliness. Learn more about how to maintain a low somatic cell count during the winter


Hoof health starts with the heifer

Last Modified: January 30, 2023
Hoof health starts with the heifer

by Tina Kohlman - UW Madison Extension 

Hoof health is essential for not only the overall health of the animal, but also for her welfare. Digital dermatitis (DD), or hairy heel warts, is an extremely painful condition for dairy cattle, reducing their ability to walk to and from the milking parlor, or to the feed bunk. Based on USDA NAHMS 2017 data, 16.8% of all cows and 2.6% of bred heifers have lameness on a dairy operation.


The Manager November 2022: Cornell Research

Last Modified: January 30, 2023
The Manager November 2022: Cornell Research

The Manager is published by Progressive Dairy, and the November issue was about the latest research in dairy cattle conducted by Cornell University Researchers. Check it out!


Winter Manure Spreading Restrictions

Last Modified: January 23, 2023
Winter Manure Spreading Restrictions

Winter manure spreading can be a tricky issue depending on where you farm. In the Northeast, some states ban winter manure spreading, while others allow it but have specific rules to follow. Regulations surrounding winter manure spreading vary greatly by state, so make sure you're up to date on what you're allowed to do in New York.


Are you tube feeding your calf correctly?

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: January 18, 2023
Are you tube feeding your calf correctly?

 and  and Camila Lage, Cornell Cooperative Extension SWNY - January 10, 2023

Although commonly used in dairy operations, there are details that we need to pay attention to when using an esophageal tube in calves when feeding colostrum or fluids.


Steps for tube-feeding calves

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: January 18, 2023
Steps for tube-feeding calves

 and  and Camila Lage, Cornell Cooperative Extension SWNY - January 10, 2023

This Document is offered in: EnglishEspanol


A Farm Advisory Team Can Help You Succeed

Last Modified: January 9, 2023
A Farm Advisory Team Can Help You Succeed

Chris Zoller, Extension Educator, Agriculture and Natural Resources, Tuscarawas County, Ohio State University Extension 

Managing all the complexities of a dairy farm is no easy task.  Weather, animal nutrition and health, crop variety selection, managing people, and monitoring financial performance are just a few of the items that add to the complexity.  Fortunately, there are several people available as a team of advisors to help you address the challenges and contribute to your success.


December 2022 Storm Damage Survey

Last Modified: January 3, 2023
December 2022 Storm Damage Survey

CCE is working with officials to understand the extent of the December 2022 Blizzard. We are collecting information on damage to agricultural infrastructure, equipment, livestock, stored crops, and/or winter produce. You can either fill out the reporting survey, found at https://cornell.ca1.qualtrics.com/.../SV_9AytO5D9oYvRCXc or report the damage to one of our team's regional specialists. If you had damage from the November 2022 storm and haven't yet reported it, you can do that at this time.


A Real Life Reminder for Farm Safety Around Animals!

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: December 2, 2022

When working with any type of livestock or equipment, it's key to consider safety to keep yourself, your farm family, employees, and animals safe.  On average from year to year, one in every four farm accidents involve animals. Below are some farm safety reminders for working with animals on the farm.

 


4 Concerns Weighing on Dairy Producers for the Year Ahead

Last Modified: November 28, 2022

By KAREN BOHNERT - Dairy Herd Management (To access the original article, click here)

We have found our way back to a new normal after enduring a world pandemic that impacted every corner of the world. Although, 2022 certainly was far from a normal year for dairy farmers. While $30-plus milk prices were welcoming, many producers shared that it didn't last long enough and wasn't high enough to absorb the stifling inflation that also has impacted everything—from labor to feed costs, to everything else in between. These four topics are on the minds of producers in the year ahead.


Chop talk: The importance of forage particle size in the diet -Progressive Dairy

Last Modified: November 28, 2022
Chop talk: The importance of forage particle size in the diet -Progressive Dairy

by Casey Havekes 

Minimizing the amount of forage particles retained on the top sieve of the Penn State Particle Separator is a good strategy for promoting desirable feeding behaviors and maximizing dry matter intake


Don't undercut the high-producing cows

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 28, 2022
Don't undercut the high-producing cows

BY ABBY BAUER, SENIOR ASSOCIATE EDITOR (For the original article click here)  

With input costs on the rise, farmers across the country are looking for ways to improve profitability and reduce spending. Feed is a big cost center and one that often gets scrutinized, but during the November Hoard's Dairyman webinar, Mike Hutjens advised the audience that the ration is not the place to cut corners.


Six Straw Alternatives to Get You Through a Bedding Shortage

Last Modified: November 14, 2022
Six Straw Alternatives to Get You Through a Bedding Shortage

By Taylor Leach - Dairy Herd Management 


Farm to School Program Looking for Farms to Supply Local Foods to Schools

Last Modified: November 7, 2022
Farm to School Program Looking for Farms to Supply Local Foods to Schools

CCE Harvest New York's Regional Farm-to-School Coordinator Program is looking for farms and food businesses to supply local foods to schools in our region, including meats and dairy products.

 


Gloves: Are You Protecting Your Herd? - PSU Extension

Last Modified: November 7, 2022
Gloves: Are You Protecting Your Herd? - PSU Extension

Wearing gloves is a simple management tool that could help prevent bacteria and help to reduce your somatic cell count.


Fitness for Transport for FARM v4.0 - Animal Health Diagnostic Center

Last Modified: November 1, 2022
Fitness for Transport for FARM v4.0 - Animal Health Diagnostic Center

Dairy animals are an important source of beef in the United States. Approximately 20 percent of the nation's total beef production on an annual basis comes from the dairy sector, including fed dairy cattle and marketed cows and bulls. This chapter specifically focuses on considerations for the marketing of dairy animals for beef production. For information on animal care for beef animals (including dairy steers) please follow the guidelines of the Beef Quality Assurance Program. 


Navel Care Beyond the Dip - Infographic available in English

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 1, 2022
Navel Care Beyond the Dip - Infographic available in English

Dairy Farming Essentials: Navel Care Beyond the Dip (Click here to access original content)

Infographic available in English


Dairy Farming Essentials: Navel Care Beyond the Dip

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: October 17, 2022
Dairy Farming Essentials: Navel Care Beyond the Dip

Disinfecting the navel cord is a common practice among farms and, for the most part, a pretty straightforward process. However, recent studies have shown that there is more to navel care than we realize. According to a study from Cornell University published in the Journal of Dairy Science (Wieland et al., 2017), umbilical infections may be more common than we diagnose on farms. While older studies indicate that just 1.3% to 14% of calves develop an umbilical infection, these authors, using more advanced technology, diagnosed umbilical disorders in 27% of all calves enrolled in their study.


AMS facility design by The Dairyland Initiative and my takeaway messages!

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: October 4, 2022

Check out this excellent resource for AMS facility design by The Dairyland Initiative!

https://thedairylandinitiative.vetmed.wisc.edu/home/housing-module/adult-cow-housing/automated-milking-systems/


When BRD occurs, diagnose and treat early for best results - Dairy Business

Last Modified: October 4, 2022
When BRD occurs, diagnose and treat early for best results - Dairy Business

by TIAGO TOMAZI, PH.D., D.V.M., DAIRY TECHNICAL SERVICES, MERCK ANIMAL HEALTH

To see the original article, click here



FARM Program Continuing Education Articles in Spanish by Lindsay Ferlito

Last Modified: September 26, 2022
FARM Program Continuing Education Articles in Spanish by Lindsay Ferlito

Version 4.0 of the National Dairy FARM Program is in effect January 1, 2020, to June 30, 2024. One of the changes to this version is the requirement of training and continuing education for employees as well as family member employees and owners. Version 4.0 requires annual continuing education in animal care and handling for anybody with animal care responsibilities, and job-specific training for the following topics if they apply:  

  1. Stockmanship
  2. Pre-weaned calf care
  3.  Non-ambulatory animals
  4. Euthanasia 
  5. Determining if animals are fit to transport 

Calf Jacket Rules of Thumb - Dairy Herd Management

Last Modified: September 20, 2022
Calf Jacket Rules of Thumb - Dairy Herd Management

By MAUREEN HANSON September 11, 2022

One way to help calves thrive through cold conditions is protecting them with calf jackets. And anyone who uses calf jackets has their own practices and preferences for implementing them. Among those "rules of thumb" shared by the experts in the trenches are:


Lean Management: Practical applications and challenges on dairy farms

Last Modified: September 20, 2022
Lean Management: Practical applications and challenges on dairy farms

By Barry Putnam and Mary Kate MacKenzie

Lean Management is a systematic approach to analyze and continuously improve the flow of information, materials, and work in a manufacturing environment. Lean systems maximize production efficiency by minimizing waste and disruptions. Lean principles and practices emerged from the Japanese auto manufacturing industry in the 1950s, and managers have since applied them across many other industries, including agriculture. As farm managers strive to utilize labor and other inputs more efficiently in response to rising costs, Lean Management offers a promising tool.


Breeding and raising the right cow for automatic milking systems

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: September 6, 2022
Breeding and raising the right cow for automatic milking systems

The breeding program and replacement herd management can play an essential role in AMS operation efficiency and profitability. 

Check out this article that Dairy Management Specialist Camila Lage wrote in partnership with Michigan State University Extension to learn more


Is your footbath working for you?

Last Modified: September 6, 2022
Is your footbath working for you?

by Betsy Hicks - South Central Team Dairy Management Specialist (For original article click here)).  

As I was working with a set of farms on a lameness project this summer, the question of footbath protocols was included in the set of intake questions.  Very few of the farms included in the project could definitively say what concentration they were aiming for, or what the volume of the bath was that they were using.  This brings the question, is your farm making your footbath work for you? Or are you just guessing?


2 minute On-Farm Feeder School Survey

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: August 23, 2022
2 minute On-Farm Feeder School Survey

Would you be interested in an On-Farm Feeder School Training in our region this fall? - Answer this 2 min survey!

  • Are you currently feeding cows and want to fine-tune your knowledge to increase efficiency?
  • Do you want to become a cow feeder and need the training to increase your knowledge?
  • Do you have employees that would be interested in learning more about feeding cows?

If any of it sounds like something you think would benefit your farm/employees take the time to answer this 2-min survey.


Give Your Herd Health Records a Tune-up - Dairy Herd Management

Last Modified: August 15, 2022
Give Your Herd Health Records a Tune-up - Dairy Herd Management

By TAYLOR LEACH August 12, 2022

On herd health day, how often do you find yourself scribbling notes and jotting down cow numbers on random pieces of paper? Probably often. But how often do you forget to plug those notes into your herd health system? Probably more than you care to admit.


What is the Net Zero Initiative for US Dairy? - by Lindsay Ferlito

Last Modified: August 15, 2022
What is the Net Zero Initiative for US Dairy? - by Lindsay Ferlito

In February, CCE Dairy Specialists from across the state and PRO-DAIRY hosted a 2-part virtual program titled "Net Zero for Dairy: What you Need to Know". The first presentation was from Karen Scanlon (EVP of Environmental Stewardship for Dairy Management Inc., and the Innovation Center for US Dairy), providing an overview of the Net Zero Initiative. This article will summarize her presentation.  


Protecting Pastures from Drought by Fay Benson

Last Modified: August 11, 2022

Drought disrupts grazing operations more than confinement operations since confinement operations plan to have stored feed for their animals so when drought weather hits they have time to react and make alternative plans. It doesn't affect the livestock. As pasture soil dries, grass growth slows, graziers try to keep their rotation going hoping for rain. When it doesn't come they have to change to stored feed which can have a negative effect on livestock production. 


NYS AG COMMISSIONER ANNOUNCES NEXT STOPS ON THE STATE FARM BILL LISTENING TOUR

Last Modified: August 5, 2022
NYS AG COMMISSIONER ANNOUNCES NEXT STOPS ON THE STATE FARM BILL LISTENING TOUR

NEW YORK STATE AGRICULTURE COMMISSIONER ANNOUNCES NEXT STOPS ON THE STATEWIDE FARM BILL LISTENING TOUR

Next Sessions to Take Place in the Hudson Valley on August 1, Western New York on August 2, Central New York on August 3, North Country on August 19, Finger Lakes on August 26, and New York City on August 30

CONTACT: 

Jola Szubielski | Jola.Szubielski@agriculture.ny.gov | 518-457-0752

Hanna Birkhead | Hanna.Birkhead@agriculture.ny.gov  | 518-457-0752


Natural cow instincts lead to bunching - Hoard`s Dairyman

Last Modified: August 4, 2022
Natural cow instincts lead to bunching - Hoard`s Dairyman

by Abby Bauer

Standing tightly together or "bunching" is not a new behavior in cows, but it is one that is frustrating for many dairy farmers. It is not uncommon that, even in a barn with plenty of space and air flow, cows will group together and seem to only live in half the barn during the summer months.


Dairy Training Resources

Kaitlyn Lutz, VMD, Bilingual Dairy Management Specialist
Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops

Last Modified: August 1, 2022

This document will guide you to many of the resources available for training dairy farm employees.  Topics include:

  • Safety
  • Animal Handling
  • Calf Care
  • Milk Quality
  • Calving Assistance
  • Reproduction
  • Herd Health
  • Lameness/Hoof Trimming
  • Forages/Feeding
  • Creating Human Resource Management Documents
  • Employee Housing
  • Learning Spanish/English

PRO-DAIRY seeks farm partners for greenhouse gas project

Last Modified: August 1, 2022
PRO-DAIRY seeks farm partners for greenhouse gas project

PRO-DAIRY Dairy Environmental Systems (DES) is seeking farm partners for a study of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from manure storage sites. Results will inform how to help dairy farms establish a baseline and then move towards sustainability. Please contact us with potential sites to be considered for inclusion in the study.



Inflation's Effect on Consumer Purchases and Dairy Farm Expansions

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 28, 2022

June's Milk Production was up by just 0.3% from 2021.New York saw a decrease of 7,000 head from 2021 to 2022 and a just a 1% increase in milk production per cow. Typically, we see a chain reaction when milk prices are high. Prices go up —> farms add cows —> milk production goes up —> prices go down. However, as we're seeing currently, year over year milk production increases of less than 1-2% can indicate strong or rising milk prices.


An introduction to dairy grazing apprenticeship & managed dairy grazing -WEBINAR

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 27, 2022
An introduction to dairy grazing apprenticeship & managed dairy grazing -WEBINAR

DGA works with farmers and Apprentices in 15 states and provides first class
education to the next generation of dairy farmers through the first of its kind
in the nation-recognized apprentice program. This meeting will also be
recorded for later viewing and translated into Spanish

Learn about:

-Dairy grazing apprenticeship (DGA) opportunities available as an Apprentice or farmer Mentor
-What managed grazing looks like on a dairy farm, with real life scenarios
-Q&A


NYS DEC Releases New CAFO Permit - PRO DAIRY

Last Modified: July 25, 2022
NYS DEC Releases New CAFO Permit - PRO DAIRY

NEW CAFO PERMIT LINK

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation released a new ECL SPDES General Permit for Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs) - Permit No. GP-0-22-001. This permit will replace the current ECL CAFO General Permit GP-0-16-001. While it was issued on July 22, 2022 the permit will become effective on January 23, 2023. 


Tired Cows Would Rather Rest than Eat - Bovine Veterinarian

Last Modified: July 25, 2022
Tired Cows Would Rather Rest than Eat - Bovine Veterinarian

When forced to make a choice, cows will pick resting overeating, according to Cassandra Tucker, Professor of Animal Science and animal behavior researcher at the University of California-Davis.


It might Not be that chill even for your non-lactating cows

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 18, 2022
It might Not be that chill even for your non-lactating cows

The recent heat wave across the country got me thinking about the intensity of heat stress Northeast dairy cows face during summer. Being from Brazil and spending my last summer in Central Valley, California (HOT!), I would think that NY summers wouldn't be so bad on cows, but that's not true. There's a cost-benefit of investing in heat abatement, even in our "moderate climate" area. 


To Retrofit Or Not To Retrofit, That Is The Question! - Tim Terry (PRO-DAIRY)

Last Modified: July 14, 2022
To Retrofit Or Not To Retrofit, That Is The Question! - Tim Terry (PRO-DAIRY)

Dairy farming is a constantly changing business. Farming for the long-term will require a facility that can change, as well. Expansion, new technology, and new enterprises may all be in every sustainable farm's future. Planning for a new, or remodeling and retrofitting an existing facility, is best done carefully and thoughtfully. 


Six Steps to Lower Your Fan Energy Bill - Dairy Herd Management

Last Modified: July 13, 2022
Six Steps to Lower Your Fan Energy Bill - Dairy Herd Management

 By TAYLOR LEACH June 25, 2022 - Dairy Herd Management 

Throughout the country, fans are running at maximum speed to help keep cows cool and comfortable. However, the non-stop heat of summer also has electric bills soaring.


Understanding and Mitigation Lameness - Resources in Spanish now Available!

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 13, 2022
Understanding and Mitigation Lameness - Resources in Spanish now Available!

Check out this series of short animated videos created in Spanish by Cornell Cooperative Extension staff based on our recent program Understanding and Mitigation Lameness. Please take advantage of this opportunity that can be used with employees in their native language.



Spotted Lanternfly has Been Found in SWNY- Report Them to Help Slow the Outbreak

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 12, 2022
Spotted Lanternfly has Been Found in SWNY- Report Them to Help Slow the Outbreak

Spotted Lanternfly, an invasive pest that has a huge appetite for grape vines, fruit trees, maple trees, and other plants, has been sighted in SWNY. Help us delay the spread of this invasive pest by photographing them, killing any that you see, and reporting them to your local CCE office.


Providing Water to Calves at Birth - Liquid Feeds Serve a Different Purpose

Last Modified: July 6, 2022
Providing Water to Calves at Birth - Liquid Feeds Serve a Different Purpose

by Rainey Rosemond, Extension educator, Dairy - PSU 

To access the original article click here

Supplemental water for calves may allow for increase growth and improved digestive function.


Matching Your Pasture Forage To Your Herd

Last Modified: June 14, 2022
Matching Your Pasture Forage To Your Herd

by Fay Benson 

After being involved with grazing livestock for much of my life, first on my family's dairy then owning a grazing dairy, and finally working here at CCE, I am surprised that more grazing doesn't happen in the Northeast. We have a good climate for growing cool-season grasses which support the nutritional needs of all ruminant livestock including the lactating dairy cow. The cost savings are substantial since no machinery is required to harvest the forage, store the forage, put the forage in front of the cow, and on top of that, they spread their own manure.


It's Time to Rethink Early Breeding of Heifers...Again

Last Modified: June 6, 2022
It's Time to Rethink Early Breeding of Heifers...Again

by Maureen Hanson - Bovine Veterinarian

Original article here  


Sign up to receive 2022 Census of Agriculture

Last Modified: June 6, 2022
Sign up to receive 2022 Census of Agriculture

Published on June 5, 2022 - Morning AgClips 

Agriculture producers who did not receive the 2017 Census of Agriculture and do not receive other USDA surveys or censuses have until June 30 to sign up to receive the 2022 Census of Agriculture


New York State Farm Directory launching in June 2022

Last Modified: June 2, 2022
New York State Farm Directory launching in June 2022

From our friends at Cornell CALS 

As part of Cornell Cooperative Extension's role in strengthening New York State agriculture, we are helping to spread word of the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets' plans to launch a statewide online Farm Directory. 


7 Steps to Start Calves on Starter

Last Modified: May 31, 2022
7 Steps to Start Calves on Starter

By Maureen Hanson, Bovine Veterinarian (Click here to access original article)


Milk fat above 4% is the new normal

Last Modified: May 31, 2022
Milk fat above 4% is the new normal

by Isaac Salfer, University of Minnesota Extension 

I can remember sitting in my Dairy Management class at the University of Minnesota in 2012 and learning that a good milk fat benchmark for a Holstein herd was 3.75%. This was backed up by historical milk market data, which saw average butterfat tests in the Upper Midwest hovering between 3.7% and 3.8% from 2000 to 2012.


Johne's Disease in Cattle by Dr. Melanie Hemenway

Last Modified: May 24, 2022
Johne's Disease in Cattle by Dr. Melanie Hemenway

This chronic, incurable bacterial infection is difficult to manage, fatal, and can be either fast or slow moving. Learning how to keep it out of the herd and/or control & manage for it to save substantial time and money.


Financial Losses from Transition Period Diseases - PSU Extension

Last Modified: May 23, 2022
Financial Losses from Transition Period Diseases - PSU Extension

by Michal Lunak - PSU Extension

Direct and Indirect costs contribute to reduced farm profits. Good management practices help reduce loss.


Large-herd automated milking survey results - Progressive Dairy

Last Modified: May 23, 2022
Large-herd automated milking survey results - Progressive Dairy

To understand the motivation and evaluate risk factors of implementing automated milking in large dairies, a survey was conducted.


Dig into your herd's lameness issues - By Katelyn Allen, Hoard`s Dairyman Intel

Last Modified: May 16, 2022
Dig into your herd's lameness issues - By Katelyn Allen, Hoard`s Dairyman Intel

"Lameness is a very broad, complicated disorder," began Jan Shearer during a Cornell University virtual workshop on understanding and mitigating the condition. To dial in on problems and potential solutions, the Extension veterinarian outlined three categories of lameness issues: claw disorders, foot skin problems, and upper leg lameness, which is often from falls or genetic concerns. The first two areas make up about 95% of lameness cases, he described.


Soil Health Opportunity for Dairy Farms - Erie County

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: May 16, 2022
Soil Health Opportunity for Dairy Farms - Erie County

Dear Dairy Producer from Erie County, 

The U.S. dairy community is collaborating on an important research initiative, the Dairy Soil and Water Regeneration project (DSWR), a six-year research initiative across 5 major dairy regions that is supported by a $10 million Foundation for Food and Agriculture (FFAR) grant.   The overall project is designed to provide measurement-based assessments of a dairy farm's greenhouse gas footprint for feed production.  This work will help deliver foundational data to fill current research gaps, assist in the sharing of best practice soil health management systems and support potential new market opportunities related to carbon, water quality and soil health.

If your farm is located in the designated area on the map and you are willing to take part in this important initiative, and/or have questions regarding the sampling or the project, please contact Mara Cloutier, Project Scientist at Soil Health Institute. She can be reached at mcloutier@soilhealthinstitute.org or by phone at (828) 708-3490.

The Soil Heath Institute will provide participants with an assessment of soil health and soil carbon stocks approximately 6 months after sampling. Furthermore, an aggregated report of soil health and carbon stocks from the New York region will be shared with you that shows how well your soil health and carbon stocks compare to others in the region. Participants in this sampling study will not be identified, and individual data collected as part of this effort will remain confidential.   


Spring 2022 fertility considerations - PRO DAIRY

Last Modified: May 9, 2022
Spring 2022 fertility considerations - PRO DAIRY

Spring 2022 fertility considerations

Kirsten Workman and Joe Lawrence

Fertilizer prices continue to rise with no relief in the immediate site. With a slowly warming spring 
that has seen snow and wet weather, manure applications in many locations have been delayed. 


First cutting: Resources for success in 2022 - PRO-DAIRY

Last Modified: May 3, 2022
First cutting: Resources for success in 2022 - PRO-DAIRY

First cutting: Resources for success in 2022 - PRO-DAIRY

By Joe Lawrence

First cutting of a perennial hay crop offers the opportunity to capture  high quantity and quality but timely harvest can be met with a number of  obstacles. This fact sheet provides links to several currently available  resources to aid in successful decision making for the upcoming season. 


RECORDING FOR MANAGING AND FEEDING COWS UNDER AMS WEBINAR IS NOW AVAILABLE!

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 27, 2022
RECORDING FOR MANAGING AND FEEDING COWS UNDER AMS WEBINAR IS NOW AVAILABLE!

Back at the beginning of April, we hosted Dr. Gregory Penner (University of Saskatchewan) and Jim Salfer (University of Minnesota) to talk about management and feeding strategies for a successful AMS operation.

If you missed the webinar but would like to view the recording, you can now access it on the link below:

Recording for the AMS webinar

Feel free to share the link with producers or allied industry individuals you think would benefit from viewing the webinar.


Managing diet nutrient variability through improved forage sampling practices

Last Modified: April 25, 2022
Managing diet nutrient variability through improved forage sampling practices

Jorge Barrientos-Blanco, Joe Lawrence, and Kristan Reed

High feed prices and volatility due to market and supply chain disruptions caused by the COVID pandemic are restating the importance of maximizing feed efficiency.


Maximize fertilizer use efficiency for peak fertilizer prices of 2022

Last Modified: April 25, 2022
Maximize fertilizer use efficiency for peak fertilizer prices of 2022

The Manager - PRO DAIRY  

Kitty O'Neil, Joe Lawrence, Kirsten Workman, and Quirine Ketterings


Dairy Acceleration Program Funds Available

Last Modified: April 18, 2022
Dairy Acceleration Program Funds Available

Funds available for the

  • organization of financial records/benchmarking up to $1,000
  • continued business planning (for farms awarded in a previous year) up to $2,500
  • business planning up to $5,000

Guidelines remain the same DAP covers 80% of the cost up to the value of the award and the farm is responsible for 20%.  

Visit https://prodairy.cals.cornell.edu/dairy-acceleration/


Dairy farming essentials: Fine-tuning your calf disbudding management

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 18, 2022
Dairy farming essentials: Fine-tuning your calf disbudding management

Disbudding calves is no one's favorite task on the farm. However, like many things we often need to do, it is a necessary action to keep our cattle, and the people who work with them, safe. 


Promises and potential of automated milking systems by Victor Malacco

Last Modified: April 5, 2022
Promises and potential of automated milking systems by Victor Malacco

What if you could spare labor time from milking and use this time to focus on the animals, the decision-making process, and fine-tune adjustments?


Key puzzle pieces that impact first-lactation milk production- Progressive Dairy

Last Modified: March 28, 2022
Key puzzle pieces that impact first-lactation milk production- Progressive Dairy

Lucas Mitchell for Progressive Dairy

When building a puzzle, many people start with the corners and put together the frame first. This process is exciting. You're starting something new and seeing the scope of the finished product.


Calving assistance guidelines: Infographic available in English and Spanish

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: March 24, 2022
Calving assistance guidelines: Infographic available in English and Spanish

Calving Assistance Guidelines (Click here to access original content)

Determining if the Cow/Heifer Needs Your Help - Animal Health Diagnostic Center (Cornell University)

Check the English and Spanish version of an infographic created for this article!


Consider Stocking Density Economics - Dairy Herd Management

Last Modified: March 24, 2022
Consider Stocking Density Economics - Dairy Herd Management

By Derek Nolan, Dairy Herd Management - To access original article click here

The milk price outlook for 2022 has been a welcomed change over the past couple of years. Increasing the number of cows in the herd may be a way to capture the benefit of high milk prices. However, feed prices and animal behavior should also be considered.


Calculating Your Cost of Production - Start with Knowing Your Numbers!

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: March 22, 2022
Calculating Your Cost of Production - Start with Knowing Your Numbers!

Cost of Production is a financial analysis tool for farms of all shapes and sizes to use to improve their decision making capacity and operate their farm business profitably.  Cost of production is calculated by adding the costs associated with a certain farm enterprise (or production area), and dividing that by the total units of production over a designated time frame (usually a year).


Five high-impact actions can reduce injuries - Hoard`s Dairyman Intel

Last Modified: March 14, 2022
Five high-impact actions can reduce injuries - Hoard`s Dairyman Intel

by John Shutske, University of Wisconsin-Madison 

To access the original article, click here

With spring just around the corner, and a reminder that the risk for severe injury being almost seven-times greater on farms than all other types of businesses, here are some important, high-impact things that our research shows will reduce risk.


Facility Focus: Does Paired Housing Make Sense for Your Calves?

Last Modified: March 8, 2022
Facility Focus: Does Paired Housing Make Sense for Your Calves?

Dairy Herd Management 

By TAYLOR LEACH February 21, 2022

To access original article, click here

Everyone needs a good friend to help them get through the hard times. Maybe calves aren't so different. 


Tips for Successful Frost Seeding

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: March 1, 2022
Tips for Successful Frost Seeding

Frost seeding is a low input and low disturbance method of improving pastures and hayfields. If potential pitfalls are addressed prior to seed getting on the ground, it can result in a more productive stand. 


Robotic Milking Systems - Fact sheet series - PRO DAIRY

Last Modified: February 23, 2022
Robotic Milking Systems - Fact sheet series - PRO DAIRY

Robotic milking systems (also referred to as automatic milking systems or voluntary milking systems) were introduced to the U.S. in 2000 and current labor costs and shortages are spurring increased adoption. A robotic milking system (RMS) is a voluntary milking system that gives individual cows the freedom to enter the milking unit at their discretion. The fact sheet series covers management changes and considerations, designing and starting up a new RMS facility, and the pros and cons of different cow flow strategies.


Calving assistance guidelines: Determining if the Cow/Heifer Needs Your Help

Last Modified: February 21, 2022
Calving assistance guidelines: Determining if the Cow/Heifer Needs Your Help

Four decisions dramatically affect the outcome of delivery. They are:

1. Frequency of observation 
2. Knowing when to intervene
3. Determine if the calf can be delivered by forced extraction (pulling)
4. When to call for professional assistance


Agronomy fact sheet series - PRO-DAIRY

Last Modified: February 15, 2022
Agronomy fact sheet series - PRO-DAIRY

Check out the latest fact sheets put together by our friends from PRO-DAIRY 

It include new and updated fact sheets about: 

  1. Farm Greenhouse Gas (GHG) inventory (new)
  2. Groundwater Protection Guidelines for Agriculture (new)
  3. How to Use Grid Soil Sample Results for the NY-PI 2.0 (new)
  4. Cover Crop Species Selection in Field Crop Systems (new)
  5. Calibrating Manure Spreaders (updated)

Check it out!


Draft CAFO Permit and Fact Sheet Released - PRO DAIRY

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 14, 2022
Draft CAFO Permit and Fact Sheet Released - PRO DAIRY

to access the original content, click here


Management matters: 3 tips for successful post-weaning calf management

Last Modified: February 11, 2022
Management matters: 3 tips for successful post-weaning calf management

by Casey Havekes  for Progressive Dairy

It is easy to fall in the pattern of thinking that once calves are weaned off milk the hard part is over, and you can turn a blind eye to them until it's time for breeding.


Hardware Disease of Cattle, by Dr. Bonnard Moseley

Last Modified: February 7, 2022
Hardware Disease of Cattle, by Dr. Bonnard Moseley

Cattle have a habit of accidentally consuming nails, wire, and other bits of metal in their day-to-day activities. Using a preventative such as a magnet can help reduce potentially expensive and/or fatal injury to the reticulum and heart from metal fragments.


Mating Decisions for Beef x Dairy Crosses Just as Important as Conventional

Last Modified: February 7, 2022
Mating Decisions for Beef x Dairy Crosses Just as Important as Conventional

by Dairy Nolan - Dairy Herd Management

To access the original article click here

The use of beef semen has become increasingly popular over the past five years. In 2017, 2.4 million units of beef semen were sold to dairy producers in the U.S. That number is over 5 million units today. Breeding dairy cattle using beef semen started as a way to increase the profit for dairy steers by producing a black-hided calf. However, over the past few years, we have learned that mating decisions for beef x dairy crosses may be just as important as conventional mating decisions. Below are considerations for sire and dam selections when adopting a beef x dairy crossbreeding program.


FIVE CATTLE DEAD IN MANURE GAS POISONING INCIDENT ON FINGER LAKES DAIRY FARM

Last Modified: February 2, 2022
FIVE CATTLE DEAD IN MANURE GAS POISONING INCIDENT ON FINGER LAKES DAIRY FARM

This is the second incident in a 12-month time span involving H2S gas on a farm using gypsum in the Finger Lakes area. This particular incident could very easily have injured or killed people instead of cattle and should be a reminder to all farms to be concerned and alert about H2S gas.

For additional information on hydrogen sulfide dangers, you can contact Tom Eskildsen at the Yates County Soil & Water Conservation District at 315-536-5188 or tom@ycsoilwater.com. Additional information and publications can be found on the Cornell University Pro-Dairy Website at https://cals.cornell.edu/pro-dairy/our-expertise/environmentalsystems/safety. Additionally, NYCAMH is always available to come to your farm and provide manure hazard safety training. For more information visit our webpage at: https://www.nycamh.org/ call NYCAMH at (800) 343-7527, or e-mail: info@nycamh.com. Article authored by Yates County Soil & Water Con Dist, Cornell ProDairy, NYCAMH


The Pros and Cons of Seeding Pasture with Big Box Store Mixes

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: January 27, 2022
The Pros and Cons of Seeding Pasture with Big Box Store Mixes

This year, pasture seed will be in short supply. However, it's not a good idea to plant a mix that you happen across at your local big box or garden supply store. This article shares why.


Klebsiella mastitis - More than just another gram-negative - PRO-DAIRY

Last Modified: January 25, 2022
Klebsiella mastitis - More than just another gram-negative - PRO-DAIRY

Klebsiella is becoming a more commonly isolated mastitis-causing organism on dairy farms across the Northeast. We have traditionally thought of the most common gram-negative organism isolated on dairies as E. coli, but over the last 20 years, that has changed on some farms. 


Transition milk has a lot of immunoglobulins - PRO DAIRY

Last Modified: January 20, 2022
Transition milk has a lot of immunoglobulins - PRO DAIRY

Antibodies in the dam's colostrum, specifically immunoglobulins G and A, are the reason why newborn calves are able to immediately combat bacterial and viral pathogens in the environment. Based on early research, the predominant recommendation to improve calf survival rates and health has been to feed newborn calves first-milking colostrum to obtain maternal IgG.


Dealing with Lice on our Ruminant Species

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: January 11, 2022
Dealing with Lice on our Ruminant Species

Lice can be a burdensome parasite, where affected animals can experience discomfort to the point of losing production. Learn about the thresholds and strategy for treatment in this article!


The story behind the scours - Hoard's Dairyman

Last Modified: January 10, 2022
The story behind the scours - Hoard's Dairyman

by Margaret Quaassdorff, Cornell Cooperative Extension and Alycia Drwencker, University of California - Davis 

Quaassdorff is a dairy management specialist for Cornell Cooperative Extension and Drwencke is a Ph.D. student at the University of California, Davis.

Determining the true cause of scours can lead to more effective treatment and care of calves 


Dairy Margin Coverage - Foundational Risk Management for your Milk Production

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: January 6, 2022
Dairy Margin Coverage - Foundational Risk Management for your Milk Production

For dairy farmers, milk production and profitability can be a tricky thing to plan for. It's even trickier when you take into consideration all of the different places where systems can break down, prices can drop, and life (or a more visual term synonymous with manure) happens. Knowing your options for farm risk management, especially dairy price risk management, is important to make sound decisions to help protect your farm financially. 


Feeding Food Waste Fact Sheet Series

Last Modified: January 6, 2022

Dairy Environmental Systems has published new fact

sheets on the topics of feeding dairy cattle food waste - wet brewers and wet
distillers grains, and anaerobic digestion biogas utilization options with a
combined heat and power (CHP) technology comparison.


Participate in the Northeast Beef x Dairy Survey

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: January 5, 2022
Participate in the Northeast Beef x Dairy Survey

Attention Dairy Producers: Your voice matters! Participate in the Northeast Beef x Dairy Survey sponsored by researchers at UCONN and Penn State! Help researchers learn more about dairy producers use of beef semen to generate beef x dairy cattle and enter for the chance to win a $50 Visa gift card!


Make room for transition cows by Katelyn Allen - Hoard's Dairyman

Last Modified: January 3, 2022
Make room for transition cows by Katelyn Allen - Hoard's Dairyman

Just as facilities with the right dimensions and amenities encourage cow comfort and production, an environment that limits a cow's natural abilities can create problems for the animal to stay healthy and perform at its best. This is never more critical than when a cow is most vulnerable around calving.


It's DMC Time! More information about 2022's Dairy Margin Coverage program.

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: December 16, 2021

You can now enroll and change your coverage options for your farm's DMC coverage, December 13, 2021 - February 18, 2022. There have been a few changes to this year's program, summarized below. Visit the Dairy Margin Coverage Program website for more information.


Know Your Numbers Know Your Options - Tuesdays January 25 - February 22

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: December 16, 2021

Annie's Project Know Your Numbers and Know your Options (KYNKYO) is a workshop series designed to deliver basic farm financial literacy that will empower farm women to better understand how financial statements assist in making rational decisions. KYNKYO helps farm women effectively communicate with their families, business partners, and lenders. 


NYS Covid-19 Pandemic Small Business Recovery Grant Program

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: December 16, 2021

The New York State COVID-19 Pandemic Small Business Recovery Grant Program was created to provide flexible grant assistance to currently viable small businesses, micro-businesses and for-profit independent arts and cultural organizations in the State of New York who have experienced economic hardship due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Understanding Milk Protein

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: December 15, 2021
Understanding Milk Protein

It's no surprise that a large portion of your milk check comes from milk components. The last year especially has demonstrated how fluctuations in component pricing can, and should, change our perspective on how to maximize components. 


Transition Cow Tuesdays Webinar series - Recordings now available!

Last Modified: December 14, 2021
Transition Cow Tuesdays Webinar series - Recordings now available!

Have you missed our series on any webinars? Don't worry! You can now access the entire webinar series recording online. Click here to learn more about the webinars, and access the resources!


Survey: New York Farmers invited to participate in statewide Vision 2050 plan

Last Modified: December 7, 2021
Survey: New York Farmers invited to participate in statewide Vision 2050 plan

NY farmers invited to participate in statewide Vision 2050 plan through survey | Morning Ag Clips

ONEONTA, N.Y. - On December 2, 2021, the Center for Agricultural Development and

Entrepreneurship (CADE), the Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management at Cornell

University, the Cornell Small Farms Program, faculty from Columbia University, Hartwick

College, and SUNY Cobleskill are pleased to launch a statewide farmer survey asking what

farmers want to see for the future of New York State's food system by 2050.


USDA Offers Funding to Reimburse Farms Transitioning to Organic Production

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 19, 2021
USDA Offers Funding to Reimburse Farms Transitioning to Organic Production

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is providing up to $20 million to reimburse agricultural producers and handlers who are certified organic and crop and livestock producers who are transitioning to organic for eligible expenses incurred during fiscal years 2020, 2021, and/or 2022.


2021 Corn silage overview by Joe Lawrence and Allison Kerwin

Last Modified: November 18, 2021
2021 Corn silage overview by Joe Lawrence and Allison Kerwin

The growing season across much of the Northeast started with average to slightly above average heat unit accumulation and below average precipitation. This provided relatively good conditions for corn planting, with trial locations planted between May 7 and May 19. Conditions remained dry, with most locations receiving designations of abnormally dry or moderate drought from the U.S. drought monitor in May and June. The exception was Aurora, which received more timely rainfall throughout May and June. At NY locations, this changed in July with rainfall well above average through July and August; however, the Alburgh, VT location remained in Moderate Drought (U.S. Drought Monitor) through harvest. This season provided another example of how seasonal rainfall totals can be misleading in a year such as this but the timing and amount of rainfall at certain stages of plant development can be very impactful. Furthermore, certain areas within the region experienced rainfall extremes far exceeding what is represented in these trials. In these areas, greater shifts in management strategies may be needed to make adjustments in feeding programs.


Pathogen problems start in the maternity pen by Abby Bauer Hoards Dairyman

Last Modified: November 18, 2021
Pathogen problems start in the maternity pen by Abby Bauer Hoards Dairyman

Once a calf is born, it faces many chances for pathogen exposure. From colostrum collection to feeding equipment and calf housing to older calves, many aspects of a farm contribute to a calf's pathogen load.


Solar Leases and Farms

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 11, 2021
Solar Leases and Farms

New York is experiencing a boom in solar development, and many of those developments intersect with farmers and their land. In this article, Caroline Hunt of Yates County shares the takeaways of the recent workshop, "Navigating Solar Lease Agreements and the Solar Development Process: A Program for NY Farmers and Rural Landowners". In it are important points to consider when leasing your farmland for solar.


Dairy farming essentials: How to infuse intramammary medications

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 4, 2021
Dairy farming essentials: How to infuse intramammary medications

Mastitis continues to be the costliest disease of dairy cattle. Antibiotic therapy still plays an essential role in the control of mastitis in dairy cows and it is essential to remember that: how we infuse intramammary medications on our cows is critical to achieve the desired results. 


FARM Program Stakeholder Survey

Last Modified: November 3, 2021
FARM Program Stakeholder Survey

If you're part of the dairy industry, take a few minutes to fill out this survey to give your input as they revise the FARM program. FARM 5.0 will go into effect in July 2024.


Grant Seekers: SAM & DUNS: Register Your Business Now!

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: September 21, 2021
Grant Seekers: SAM & DUNS: Register Your Business Now!

SAM & DUNS registrations are free and needed to apply for federal grant opportunities. While it takes minutes to apply, it may take weeks to receive your number. Registering your farm or business now means that you'll be prepared for grant opportunities that may come your way.


Northeast SARE is now accepting applications for its 2022 Farmer Grant Proposals

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: September 20, 2021
Northeast SARE is now accepting applications for its 2022 Farmer Grant Proposals

Proposals are due by 5 p.m. ET on Tuesday, November 16, 2021.

Know if this program is for you here:


Are you mastering your colostrum management?

Camila Lage, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: September 9, 2021
Are you mastering your colostrum management?

Mastering your colostrum management is key to a successful replacement heifer raising program. Recently, a group of calf experts revisited the goals for optimal antibody blood levels to improve calf health. Find more information here


Cornell Cooperative Extension Farmer School Tax Series

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: September 1, 2021

Cornell Cooperative Extension's Farmer Tax School: An educational series from Cornell Cooperative Extension Farm Business Management Specialists offering courses designed to inform and empower farm managers to better understand their tax obligations, management strategies, and improve farm profitability. This consists of four courses offered October 2021 - January 2022. For more information, visit tinyurl.com/ccetaxschool. 


How you Administer Injections Matters

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: August 10, 2021
How you Administer Injections Matters

Injections are a necessary part of livestock management. Not only is each formulated for a different part of the body, but they're also formulated to be injected into a specific layer of tissue (skin vs muscle vs vein). This article and graphic illustrate the proper angles for injection administration. 


USDA Ready to Help NY Farmers Recover from Recent Storms

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 22, 2021
USDA Ready to Help NY Farmers Recover from Recent Storms

SYRACUSE, New York, July 16, 2021 — Recent extreme weather conditions have impacted farmers and ranchers in New York. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), through the Farm Service Agency (FSA), has disaster assistance programs available to help agricultural producers recover after natural disasters, including floods. 


Cause, Prevention, and Treatment of Foot Rot in Cattle

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: June 24, 2021
Cause, Prevention, and Treatment of Foot Rot in Cattle

The solidity of cattle's feet is essential for proper health, gains, and performance, thereby reducing the potential for economic loss and added veterinary bills. Foot rot is an infectious disease that is treatable if caught early enough and properly managed, with most animals making a full recovery. This article by Oklahoma State University shares clinical signs, prevention, and treatment options.


Seeking Dairy Farms to Join Dairy Grazing Cohort

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: June 11, 2021
Seeking Dairy Farms to Join Dairy Grazing Cohort

The Northeast Dairy Business Innovation Center has introduced a new initiative to

support new or existing dairy farms that would like to increase grazing
practices within their operation. As part of this initiative, Fay Benson with
Cornell Cooperative Extension is partnering with Pennsylvania Association of
Sustainable Agriculture (PASA) to expand well-managed grazing lands in New York
and Pennsylvania and support regional farmers in their grazing transition. 


What Are You Culturing?

Last Modified: June 11, 2021
What Are You Culturing?

Tim Terry, Dairy Farm Strategic Planning Specialist with Cornell PRO-DAIRY, shares strategies for identifying and creating a positive environment for your farm, family, and employees.  


What can the Dairy Advancement Program do for You?

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: June 11, 2021

Dairy producers in New York State, with a preference for small to mid-sized farms, are eligible for funding to address business needs to stay competitive and sustainable in today's agricultural environment! The Dairy Advancement Program provides financial support to NY dairy producers that can be used to engage professionals for financial analysis and to create business plans, design new or remodeled farm facilities, and develop farmstead environmental plans, including design of practices identified in the farm comprehensive nutrient management plan. For more information, contact Katelyn Walley-Stoll in the SWNY region at 716-640-0522 or visit prodairy.cals.cornell.edu/dairy-advancement.


Dystocia and Difficult Calvings: A Perspective from Dam and Calf (Part 1)

Last Modified: May 20, 2021
Dystocia and Difficult Calvings: A Perspective from Dam and Calf (Part 1)

Regional dairy specialists Betsy Hicks and Casey Havekes walk through some important considerations for farms when faced with dystocia and difficult calvings. Difficult calvings are estimated to cost the industry $400 million annually, emphasizing the need for prevention and quick action when the arise.


Dystocia and Difficult Calvings: A Perspective from Dam and Calf (Part 2)

Last Modified: May 20, 2021
Dystocia and Difficult Calvings: A Perspective from Dam and Calf (Part 2)

Dystocia and difficult calvings can have negative effects for both the dam and the calf. However, with quick action, close monitoring, and best management those setbacks can be overcome. Regional Dairy Specialists Casey Havekes and Betsy Hicks share information on how to set the herd up for success following a difficult calving.


Keeping Dairy Calves Cool in Warm Weather

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: May 20, 2021
Keeping Dairy Calves Cool in Warm Weather

As research evolves and weather patterns change, the importance of keeping dairy calves cool is becoming clearer. Calves, similar to cows, can experience an increased heat load at a THI of 68 or higher. Cooling calves with shade and fans can promote their health and productivity throughout their life. 


Methane emissions from U.S. dairies in decline

Last Modified: May 20, 2021
Methane emissions from U.S. dairies in decline

Farms work diligently to be the best manager and stewards of the land as possible. That hard work is beginning to show in the media. Methane emissions from animal agriculture is on the decline in the U.S. as new technology and herd sizes combine to reduce output of the greenhouse gas.


Pre-Weaned Dairy Calf Calorie Requirements and Nutritional Scours

Last Modified: May 20, 2021
Pre-Weaned Dairy Calf Calorie Requirements and Nutritional Scours

Regional dairy specialists Casey Havekes and Margaret Quaassdorff share information about the delicate balance of calf nutrition. Learn more about energy requirements, identifying scours compared to loose manure, causes of nutritional scours, troubleshooting options, and more in the full article. 


To Treat or Not to Treat by Katelyn Allen

Last Modified: May 20, 2021
To Treat or Not to Treat by Katelyn Allen

Antibiotic stewardship is a popular topic these days. As farms strive to reduce their use of antibiotics, keeping these tips in mind to determine if treatment is the best option, can be helpful. 


Understanding use of caustic paste to prevent horn growth on New York dairy farm

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: May 20, 2021
Understanding use of caustic paste to prevent horn growth on New York dairy farm

Across the United States, 94% of farms perform disbudding or dehorning procedures to prevent horn growth for the safety of humans and animals in their dairy herd. Despite the increasing popularity, limited research is available leaving many questions unanswered on best management practices for caustic paste disbudding. Recently, a benchmarking survey was sent out to better understand how NY farms are using this management tool.


Are Cows Emotionally Intelligent? by Dr. Tripp

Last Modified: May 19, 2021
Are Cows Emotionally Intelligent? by Dr. Tripp

Cow comfort is an important aspect of management on farm to promote the health and productivity of the herd. Check out this break down of time budgets and some considerations for the herd.


Keeping dairy and processing separate by Gary Sipiorski

Last Modified: May 19, 2021
Keeping dairy and processing separate by Gary Sipiorski

As more dairy farmers consider marketing directly to consumers, Hoard's Dairyman has provided some additional insight on setting up a processing enterprise and how that might financially interlink with the dairy farm. Their information is available here, or check out the On-Farm Dairy Processing Webinar the team hosted in 2020.


Pneumonia can strike all ages on dairy

Last Modified: May 19, 2021
Pneumonia can strike all ages on dairy

Ideal BRD control program can be broken down into three phases: newborn, weaning, and breeding age heifers and cows. While BRD can be detrimental in a herd, prevention and management is key.


Research shows calves experience pain for 9 weeks after disbudding

Last Modified: May 19, 2021
Research shows calves experience pain for 9 weeks after disbudding

Calves experience pain for 9 weeks following hot-iron disbudding. Better understand how calves experience that pain and current best management practices for pain relief here.


Robotic Milking Could Be the Key to Your Dairy's Expansion by Rob Pol

Last Modified: May 19, 2021
Robotic Milking Could Be the Key to Your Dairy's Expansion by Rob Pol

Robotic milking can be a useful management tool for some farms. If considering adding robots to your farm, check out these management considerations to to maximize the potential benefits. 


Short on hay this spring? by Joe Lawrence and Kitty O'Neil

Last Modified: May 19, 2021
Short on hay this spring? by Joe Lawrence and Kitty O'Neil

Managing forage inventories can be a difficult task, especially in years when weather challenges cut into harvest yields. Learn more about some management options when forages are short in the spring.


The Manager, March 2021

Last Modified: May 19, 2021
The Manager, March 2021

The March 2021 issue of "The Manager" published by Progressive Dairy focuses on managing inputs: a fresh look. The Manager is published by Progressive Dairy, an award-winning magazine that provides compelling features, helpful articles, insightful news analysis, and entertaining commentary about the people, practices and topics related to a dairy lifestyle.


Understanding Animal Welfare Through Behavior by Dr. Emily Miller-Cushon

Last Modified: May 19, 2021

Behavior can provide a great deal of information about how cows experience their environment and their welfare. While public concern does drive efforts to improve animal welfare, there are also positive economic implications for producers.


Managing and Abating Heat Stress on your Dairy in 2021

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: May 12, 2021
Managing and Abating Heat Stress on your Dairy in 2021

Understanding recent research on heat stress and what it means for your dairy herd. In case you missed the webinar, you can view the recording and slides online.


Heat Stress and the Often-Forgotten Heifers by Carly Becker

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: May 5, 2021
Heat Stress and the Often-Forgotten Heifers by Carly Becker

Research continues to show the negative long term effects that heat stress in heifers can have on dairy production. Carly Becker with Penn State Extension recently shared some useful reminders on the importance of cooling heifers. 


Dairy Market Watch - April 2021

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 28, 2021

Dairy Market Watch is an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. Dairy Market Watch is published on the last Tuesday of every month, funded in part by Cornell Pro-Dairy, and is compiled by Katelyn Walley-Stoll, Farm Business Management Specialist with the Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops Program.


Avoid fermentation failure in spring silages by Ralph Ward

Last Modified: April 27, 2021

Ralph Ward with Cumberland Valley Analytical Services recently published in Hoard's Dairyman tips for harvesting small grains. Learn more about the effect moisture can have on your fermentation here. 


Checking Insect Traps in the Snow - What we have so far?

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 22, 2021
Checking Insect Traps in the Snow - What we have so far?

As of this week, we have our first moth captures in SWNY. Two black cutworm moths were captured in Steuben County and no moths were collected from Cattaraugus County. As temperatures increase and the spring progresses, be on the lookout for these yield robbing pests.


Spring Green-Up and Harvest Outlook by Betsy Hicks

Last Modified: April 19, 2021

Betsy Hicks, Regional Dairy Specialist, with the SCNY Dairy and Field Crops Team shares timely information on Spring Green-Up, growing degree days, cover crops, and monitoring alfalfa heights. Make the most out of your crops this season with these reminders.


Managing Forage Digestibility to Combat High Commodity Prices by Joe Lawrence

Last Modified: April 14, 2021
Managing Forage Digestibility to Combat High Commodity Prices by Joe Lawrence

The recent rise in commodity feed cost on dairies is no secret. Joe Lawrence, with Cornell's PRO-DAIRY Program has put together an article on capture forage fiber digestibility to help combat high feed cost.  


Considerations for Timely Euthanasia in Calf Care

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 7, 2021
Considerations for Timely Euthanasia in Calf Care

Even while farms work hard to promote calf health, illness and injury are bound to happen from time to time. When these situations arise, it's important to be prepared and have protocols in place to ensure timely euthanasia occurs when necessary. For more information, reach out to Alycia Drwencke


Dairy Market Watch - March 2021

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: March 30, 2021
Dairy Market Watch - March 2021

Dairy Market Watch is an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. Dairy Market Watch is published on the last Tuesday of every month, funded in part by Cornell Pro-Dairy, and is compiled by Katelyn Walley-Stoll, Farm Business Management Specialist with the Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops Program.


Weed Control in Wheat and Nitrogen Carrier Issues

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: March 24, 2021
Weed Control in Wheat and Nitrogen Carrier Issues

Populations of winter annual weeds will become more prevalent in late March/early April and can compete with wheat and barley and slow the rate of crop development potentially reducing yield. If winter annual weeds like common chickweed, henbit, purple deadnettle, marestail/horseweed, and others emerge with the small grain and are left unchecked, the potential impact on yield could be great.

Certain herbicides can be applied in different nitrogen fertilizer carriers, but timing is critical. Article written by Dwight Lingenfelter with Penn State University.


Milk's most important contact surface by Abby Bauer

Last Modified: March 18, 2021
Milk's most important contact surface by Abby Bauer

A combination of factors contributes to high-quality milk, but for New York dairy farmer Jim Davenport, he believes a low somatic cell count begins at the teat level. Hoard's Dairyman recently summarized this producers successful approach to to clean milk, here. For more information on dairy topics, reach out to Alycia Drwencke.


Nitrogen Applications Being Made to Winter Cereals - How much should you apply?

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: March 16, 2021
Nitrogen Applications Being Made to Winter Cereals - How much should you apply?

Winter cereals like wheat, should have some nitrogen (N), most of the phosphorus (P), and possibly some potassium (K) in the fertilizer band at planting; soil test results should be analyzed before making a decision about P and K application amounts. With recent cool temperatures, spring nitrogen applications are being made across Western NY as growers are able to get across the fields efficiently. When attempting to achieve near-maximum yields of wheat and when diseases can be controlled, the nitrogen rates can be increased to 80 to 90 pounds per acre. The full article on fertilizer rates for winter cereal crops can be found here.


The Handy Bt-Trait Table for U.S. Corn Production

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: March 8, 2021
The Handy Bt-Trait Table for U.S. Corn Production

2021 marks the 25th year of commercialization of Bt corn in the United States. The first Bt corn hybrids helped producers control European corn borer, but Bt has come a long way since then. Bt hybrids are now planted on greater than 80% of U.S. corn acres. The benefits of widespread use of Bt hybrids include a reduction in corn borer in the landscape (benefitting conventional corn & vegetables too), and an overall reduction in insecticide use. Producers in SWNY are reviewing seed catalogs to purchase the best corn hybrids for their operation. Some acres in the region are continuous corn and would warrant the need for protection against certain pests such as corn rootworm. This PDF document provides information about the trade names, primary insect targets, and herbicide tolerances for each product. If you have questions about corn traits or placement, contact Josh Putman at 716-490-5572 or jap473@cornell.edu.


Considerations for Cow Cooling this Year

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: March 5, 2021
Considerations for Cow Cooling this Year

While heat stress in dairy cows may not be at the forefront of anyone's mind preparing for warm weather now can help farms prevent losses in milk production and keep cows comfortable in 2021. Farms should ensure they are providing adequate cooling to all ages and classes of animals on the farm, including calves, heifers, and dry cows. Recent work out of the University of Florida has emphasized the importance of providing heat abatement to non-lactating animals on the farm.As farms prepare for the warmer months ahead, take the time to check all cooling equipment is functioning properly for each age and class of animal on the farm. For more information about heat abatement for dairy cows, contact Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist, at 517-416-0386 or amd453@cornell.edu.


Could farmers be teaching cows bad habits? by Carla Wardin

Last Modified: March 4, 2021
Could farmers be teaching cows bad habits? by Carla Wardin

Although it might be entertaining to see cows running toward the feedbunk and eagerly start eating, this is also a sign that they're hungry. Unfortunately, they might be so hungry that it's a detriment. "The reason why that can be concerning is that if cows do that too much, they're going to consume too much feed too quickly," said Trevor DeVries, professor and cattle behavior specialist at the University of Guelph. "That can then have a negative impact on the rumen environment." Additionally, farms should look for and manage sorting of feed in their herd to promote rumen health. You can read the full article here or reach out to Alycia Drwencke, for more information.


Replace Missing PTO Shields at Discount Prices

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: March 3, 2021
Replace Missing PTO Shields at Discount Prices

PTO shields are not often thought about, and when they are, it's usually in a negative light. However, they are an important part of a farm's safety plan. PTOs are dangerous and can result in catastrophic injury. Installing a shield is an added barrier of protection between man and machine. A program offered through the New York Center for Agriculture Medicine and Health (NYCAMH) can provide replacement PTO shields at substantially reduced cost. These parts cost between $59 - $83 through the program and can be ordered at https://www.nycamh.org/program...


Dairy Market Watch - February 2021

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 24, 2021

Dairy Market Watch is an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. Dairy Market Watch is published on the last Tuesday of every month, funded in part by Cornell Pro-Dairy, and is compiled by Katelyn Walley-Stoll, Farm Business Management Specialist with the Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops Program.


Liberty-resistant Palmer amaranth confirmed in Arkansas

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 23, 2021
Liberty-resistant Palmer amaranth confirmed in Arkansas

Researchers from the University of Arkansas have identified Palmer amaranth populations that survived several applications of Liberty (glufosinate) Herbicide. Seed was collected and tested in the greenhouse showing a resistance of 16 times the typical field use rate. These findings represent the first documented case of a broadleaf resistance to Liberty Herbicide in the world. Liberty link traits are an additional tool to help corn and soybean producers control problematic weeds like Palmer amaranth, waterhemp, and marestail. Palmer amaranth is now present in 3 counties in New York State, one of which is in Southwest NY. Seed was collected from these populations in the fall of 2020 and are being tested for resistance to our commonly used herbicides. Stay tuned as we conduct research on these NY populations. Full article from the University of Arkansas can be found here.


Critical Calf Care Series Recordings and Resources

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 18, 2021
Critical Calf Care Series Recordings and Resources

Did you miss any of the sessions in our Critical Calf Care series? Not to worry, we have you covered! All of the sessions have been recorded and resources are available for you to download. Topics covered included recognizing and diagnosing disease, dystocia and difficult calvings, record keeping and the economics of disease, hydration and electrolytes, scours and nutrition, emergency situations, and an expert panel. Focusing on calf care and these areas will promote the success of your herd. For more information on calf care or the series, reach out to Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist.


Do you have Alfalfa Snout Beetle on your farm?

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 11, 2021
Do you have Alfalfa Snout Beetle on your farm?

-Article written by Dr. Elson Shields, Department of Entomology, Cornell University-

Alfalfa Snout Beetle is a significant problem in Northern NY. When alfalfa snout beetle (ASB) becomes fully established on your farm, its presence cost you $300-$600 per cow annually. The higher producing dairies are hit harder than the lower producing dairies because the higher producing dairies are more reliant on their production of high quality alfalfa and grass forage to maintain their high milk production.  This is an unbelievable amount of loss caused by ASB and is ignored by many in the northern New York Agribusiness community. ASB damage is frequently missed and stand loss is often blamed on winter kill. It has not been confirmed in SWNY, but if you feel your alfalfa stands are diminishing quickly, it might be time to look deeper. The full article can be found on Field Crop News.


Sick calves never reach their full potential by Carla Wardin

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 8, 2021
Sick calves never reach their full potential by Carla Wardin

Carla Wardin, a Michigan dairy farmer recently highlighted some key considerations from the CCE Critical Calf Care Series episode 3 for an article in Hoard's Dairyman. Calves and replacement heifers account for 15% to 20% of milk production costs, which ranks third right after feed and labor costs, making early life care extremely important. Maintaining accurate records for your farm to evaluate is a useful management tool for your farm to make decisions. It should be noted, farms don't need to start from scratch, as there many record keeping templates and options that can be adapted for use. The full article can be found here, or reach out to Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist for more information on record keeping and calf care. 


Ag Value Assessment Reminder

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 4, 2021

The agricultural value assessment is a program offered to eligible farms that can reduce the property taxes on land that is used for farming. The program has to be applied for annually by March 1st


Brief survey on the use of caustic paste for dairy calves

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 4, 2021
Brief survey on the use of caustic paste for dairy calves

Do you use caustic paste on your dairy? We want to hear from you! Please consider filling out this brief survey, which should take about 5 minutes. All responses are completely anonymous and will be used to better understand how dairy producers are using caustic paste to prevent horn growth in their calves. An article will be created to allow producers to bench mark their current practices to other responses. Survey responses will also be used to develop research projects that will inform best management practices for the use of caustic paste. If you have questions or concerns, please reach out to Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist with the Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock, and Field Crops program at 517-416-0386 or amd453@cornell.edu.

https://cornell.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_3NQNijWHl07Cu6q


Grain Handling and Storage Safety

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 4, 2021
Grain Handling and Storage Safety

Grain facilities are locations that receive, handle, store, process, and ship bulk agricultural commodities like corn, soybeans, wheat, and oats. In New York, these facilities can be quite large and can handle large quantities of grain products. Additionally, many agricultural producers have their own grain facilities for on-farm storage. The grain handling industry is hazardous because workers can be exposed to serious and life-threatening dangers. Suffocation is the number one cause of death in grain storage bins. There are things that can be done to reduce these hazards. Information and resources can be found on the United States Department of Labor Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) website.


Recognizing and Diagnosing Disease in Pre-weaned Calves

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 3, 2021
Recognizing and Diagnosing Disease in Pre-weaned Calves

CCE Regional Dairy Specialists Alycia Drwencke and Casey Havekes share a written summary of the key concepts discussed in the first session of our 7-week series titled "Critical Calf Care". You can access the recording of the session here, which focused on recognizing and diagnosing disease in pre-weaned calves. A critical component to determining the success of sick calves is recognizing signs of disease, from both a physiological and a behavioral standpoint early on. The full article is available here. In summary, monitoring behavioral and physiological indicators of disease can help you identify issues early on, which will ultimately improve the outcome of treatment and likely decrease costs. Observing calves is a very cost-effective strategy that can improve calf success throughout the vulnerable pre-weaning period. Lastly, implementing a scoring system and keeping detailed behavior records as part of your daily routine can be very beneficial in early disease intervention. If you have questions, or would like to implement a scoring system on your farm, reach out to Alycia Drwencke at 517-416-0386 or amd453@cornell.edu.


Microgrant for Dairy Farmers in NY

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: January 28, 2021
Microgrant for Dairy Farmers in NY

The new Dairy Forward program is a partnership between American Farmland Trust (AFT) and Chobani. This program aims to help select dairy farm families in New York access information and professional services to help plan for farm transitions in the face of tremendous challenges such as a weak dairy economy, disruptions from severe weather, and an aging farmer population. AFT will make grants of $500 to $5,000 for professional services that further goals associated with farm transfer and succession planning, farm business planning, permanently protecting land, or adopting regenerative farming practices. This is a great opportunity for dairy farm families who are thinking about transitioning their farm to a new generation, hoping to protect their farm, looking to improve farm profitability, or are interested in adopting regenerative practices. Applications are currently available until funds are used up. Funds will be paid directly to business providers.


Dairy Market Watch - January 2021

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: January 27, 2021
Dairy Market Watch - January 2021

Dairy Market Watch is an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. Dairy Market Watch is published on the last Tuesday of every month, funded in part by Cornell Pro-Dairy, and is compiled by Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist with the Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops Program.


Hay or Nay? Should you provide hay to pre-weaned dairy calves? by Casey Havekes

Last Modified: January 21, 2021
Hay or Nay? Should you provide hay to pre-weaned dairy calves? by Casey Havekes

Regional Dairy Specialist, Casey Havekes with the North Country Regional Ag Team recently interviewed Dr. Emily Miller-Cushon, a professor of Animal Science at the University of Florida. You can listen to that conversation here, or Casey has also written an article to highlight some of the key concepts discussed. Specifically, Casey and Emily discuss the provision of hay for pre-weaned calves, which has increased in popularity for researcher and industry members over the last several years. Current research shows there are several benefits to providing hay to pre-weaned calves, and it can be provided as early as the first few days of life. For more information, read the full article or reach out to Alycia Drwencke. 


Meet our New Faculty Member: Dr. Louis Longchamps

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: January 21, 2021
Meet our New Faculty Member: Dr. Louis Longchamps

Dr. Longchamps is an assistant professor in the Soil and Crop Science section of the School of Integrative Plant Science. His academic focus is on precision agriculture, digital agronomy, on-farm experimentation, and soil and crop improvement. He has a Ph.D. in weed science where he focused on weed distribution in corn fields in order to assess the best approach for weed spot spraying technologies. His postdoctoral studies worked to improve nutrient, water, and seed use efficiency by soil mapping and remote sensing. Dr. Longchamps experience will pair nicely with current and new faculty at Cornell University.


What does the latest relief package hold for dairy? by John Newton

Last Modified: January 14, 2021
What does the latest relief package hold for dairy? by John Newton

John Newton, chief economist with the American Farm Bureau Federation recently published an article in Hoard's Dairyman. Newton discusses the latest relief package and what it means for the dairy industry as well as previous government relief. You can read the entire article here


Herbicide Resistance Update on Marestail

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: January 13, 2021
Herbicide Resistance Update on Marestail

Horticulture Weed Scientist, Dr. Lynn Sosnoskie, has been conducting some interesting research over the past few months. Extension specialists from all around the state collected and submitted weed specimens last fall for herbicide-resistance testing to better understand the best management practices for these weeds in field crops. We now have preliminary results from the first screening on horseweed aka marestail. Thirty populations have been tested so far and, it appears, that 27 out of 30 have resistance to the field-use rate of glyphosate (Roundup). Testing will continue with different chemistries so that we can provide growers with proper control measures. Join us next week for the Field Crop Series where we will cover topics on weeds, diseases, and insects in further detail. 


Know your calves to catch illnesses early by Carla Wardin

Last Modified: January 11, 2021
Know your calves to catch illnesses early by Carla Wardin

Hoard's Dairyman recently summarized some key points discussed in the first session of the CCE Critical Calf Care series. This article summarizes the importance of monitoring your calves behavior to catch illness early. Behavioral changes will often occur prior to clinical signs of disease, highlighting the need to understand calf behavior. For more information on calf care or behavior, reach out to Dairy Management Specialist, Alycia Drwencke


Dairy Market Watch - December 2020

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: December 21, 2020
Dairy Market Watch - December 2020

Dairy Market Watch is an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. Dairy Market Watch is published on the last Tuesday of every month, funded in part by Cornell Pro-Dairy, and is compiled by Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist with the Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops Program.


Dairy Grazing Series Survey

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: December 17, 2020
Dairy Grazing Series Survey

We are looking to host a dairy grazing series in 2021 in collaboration with the CCE South Central Dairy and Field Crops Team and would like your feedback! Please fill out a quick 2 minute survey to help us better cover topics you value. The survey will close January 16th. For questions or comments about this series, please reach out to Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist at amd453@cornell.edu or 517-416-0386.

https://cornell.ca1.qualtrics....


Narrow Down the Cause of Calf Scours

Last Modified: December 17, 2020
Narrow Down the Cause of Calf Scours

Hoard's Dairyman recently summarized tips for narrowing down the cause of calf scours. The article highlights key management consideration that were discussed in an episode of "Troubleshooting Herd Health Issues on Your Dairy" a podcast by Cornell PRO-DAIRY and Regional Dairy Specialists. Following these best management practices can help you identify the type of scours occurring on your farm and reduce the prevalence in your calves. For more information, reach out to Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist. 


Sneaky Pasture Weeds - Sedges and Rushes

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: December 14, 2020
Sneaky Pasture Weeds - Sedges and Rushes

Pasture weeds are a thorn in the side for many graziers, but one particular group, the sedges and rushes, have a special notoriety. They like to inhabit poorer clay soils and thrive with wet feet. Mowing and tillage are ineffective in reducing their prevalence, as they can spread via underground structures and have dense root systems containing a large amount of stored energy. Unlike some other weeds, they unfortunately have low palatability, and if left unmanaged, can take over large portions of a pasture. Kitty O'Neal, Regional Field Crops and Forage Specialist, shares some more details about these plants' biologies and considerations for control.


"It's Always the Nutritionist's Fault!"

Last Modified: December 10, 2020

CCE Regional Dairy Specialists Casey Havekes, Betsy Hicks and Margaret Quaassdorff, share an overview of the key topics discussed in their recent webinar "It's Always the Nutritionist's Fault!" The role your nutritionist plays in the success of your dairy goes beyond the diet they put together. Ensuring good communication, having a basic understanding of your diet, and knowing what additives are incorporated and why they are added, can improve performance on your dairy. It is equally important to recognize that herd management also plays a critical role in success as nutrition alone will only take your herd so far. In case you missed the live webinar, a recap of the main points is available here. You can also click here to watch the recording on YouTube. For more information on dairy management, reach out to Alycia Drwencke.


Register for the Virtual CORE Pesticide Training in January

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: December 9, 2020
Register for the Virtual CORE Pesticide Training in January

Join us for another round of CORE training to obtain your pesticide license or receive 1.75 DEC recertification credits in the CORE category. Register online for January 12th from 9am - 10:50am or January 14th from 11am - 12:50pm for only $20. We will provide an overview of the basic information involved in the pesticide application certification process and will present the basics of Integrated Pest Management (IPM) as well as general pesticide safety, regulations and pesticide resistance. *IMPORTANT NOTE* Because of COVID-19, the DEC did not require growers whose licenses expired in November of 2019 or later to renew their applicator's license in order to buy & spray restricted use materials during the 2020 growing season. That discretionary policy is no longer in effect. If your license expired between November 2019 and November 23, 2020, you must obtain the full number of recertification credits and renew your license by February 23, 2021. If your license expires after November 23, 2020, you will follow the typical DEC guidelines.  Feel free to contact Josh Putman with any questions. We hope to see you there!


Virtual CORE Pesticide Training and DEC Recertification

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: December 1, 2020
Virtual CORE Pesticide Training and DEC Recertification

*IMPORTANT NOTE* Because of COVID-19, the DEC did not require growers whose licenses expired in November of 2019 or later to renew their applicator's license in order to buy & spray restricted use materials during the 2020 growing season.  That discretionary policy is no longer in effect. If your license expired between November 2019 and November 23, 2020, you must obtain the full number of recertification credits and renew your license by February 23, 2021. If your license expires after November 23, 2020, you will follow the typical DEC guidelines. 

 


The Results are in for SWNY! Soybean Cyst Nematode Distribution in the State

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 24, 2020
The Results are in for SWNY! Soybean Cyst Nematode Distribution in the State

-Information prepared by Jaime Cummings, NYS Integrated Pest Management Program-

The 2020 statewide SCN survey revealed 23 NEW counties confirmed with at least one field positive for SCN. In SWNY, 3 out of 5 counties tested positive for SCN (Steuben, Allegany, and Chautauqua). This brings us to a total of 30 counties with SCN confirmations since 2016. The maps below illustrate the progress and results of our SCN testing over the past few years. Additional resources about SCN can be accessed at: https://www.thescncoalition.com/resources/tools-to-download. Also, check out these short videos titled "Let's Talk Todes" to learn more about managing soybean cyst nematode.

 


Virtual Dairy Feeder School Recordings

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 24, 2020
Virtual Dairy Feeder School Recordings

Did you miss out on the virtual dairy feeder school program that was put on by Cornell Cooperative Extension Regional Dairy Specialists and Cornell PRO-DAIRY? Not to fear! The recordings and slide PDF's for the virtual program are now available in both English and Spanish. For additional information, reach out to Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist.  


Dairy Market Watch - November 2020

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 23, 2020
Dairy Market Watch - November 2020

Dairy Market Watch is an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. Dairy Market Watch is published on the last Tuesday of every month, funded in part by Cornell Pro-Dairy, and is compiled by Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist with the Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops Program.


Farmland: To Purchase or to Lease?

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 23, 2020
Farmland: To Purchase or to Lease?

This year's growing season is coming to a rapid close. In thinking to the year ahead, how, where, and at what scale we want to farm may come back under the lens of consideration. Perhaps there is an opportunity to increase forage and crop production by expanding into more acreage. Maybe a chance to get into farming has presented itself. Whether you are looking to start a farm or are a seasoned farmer looking to expand the acreage of your enterprise, you can choose to either lease or purchase land.


End-of-Season Combine Clean-out Recommendations

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 19, 2020
End-of-Season Combine Clean-out Recommendations

For many growers in Southwest New York, fall harvest is coming to an end. Now is the time to prepare harvest equipment for winter storage. Proper preparation reduces the likelihood of animals nesting in the equipment which can lead to electrical damage resulting in fire, improves the function and longevity of parts, and puts a closure to the 2020 growing season. 


Spotted Lanternfly Confirmed Found in NYS

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 17, 2020
Spotted Lanternfly Confirmed Found in NYS

The Spotted Lanternfly, a foreign pest known to be highly destructive in crops including maple trees, apple trees, grape vines, and hops, has been identified on Staten Island, areas of the Hudson Valley, and in the Southern Tier. Monitoring is ongoing, and the public is urged to continue to report findings of the insects and egg masses through the colder months to Ag and Markets at spottedlanternfly@agriculture.ny.gov. Early reporting can help with the development of targeted management plans to slow the establishment and spread of this insect. 


Horizontal Silo Feedout Safety Protocols By James Carrabba

Last Modified: November 12, 2020
Horizontal Silo Feedout Safety Protocols By  James Carrabba

Removal of feed from a bunker silo or a drive over silage pile is a daily task on the farm that has a lot of potential for serious injuries. The dangers include falls, engulfments, runovers and entanglements, which can result in serious injuries or death. There have been cases where feeders have fallen from the leading edge of a silage face and dropped 15 to 20 feet to the concrete pad below. Another very serious safety hazard is silage face collapse which can happen without warning. Even the most meticulously maintained silage faces can collapse suddenly. Unfortunately, for producers, there are no universal industry standards that can be referred to for horizontal silo feedout safety. In the rest of this article, James Carrabba, Agricultural Safety Specialist with New York Center for Agricultural Medicine and Health (NYCAMH) shares safety protocols for horizontal silo feedout. 


Managing Corn Rootworm and a New Control Option for New York Farmers

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 12, 2020
Managing Corn Rootworm and a New Control Option for New York Farmers

Biological Control of Corn Rootworm with Persistent Entomopathogenic Nematodes: An opportunity to try them on your farm

*Elson Shields, Entomology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Corn rootworm (CRW) is the number one pest of corn in both NY and the U.S.  Recent NY field data are showing that the biocontrol nematodes being released against alfalfa snout beetle are also having an impact on CRW after the field is rotated from alfalfa into corn.  Research in NNY for the past 18 years has shown that a single field application of persistent biocontrol nematodes inoculates the field for multiple years and across rotations.  In 75 fields following a typical alfalfa-corn rotation, not only did the biocontrol nematodes persist for multiple years at sufficient populations to suppress soil insects, but biocontrol nematode populations were higher after 4-years of corn than in the alfalfa before being rotated to corn.  These results suggested the biocontrol nematodes were attacking CRW during the corn years of the rotation.


NY Farm Service Agency to Host Meetings on Coronavirus Food Assistance Program 2

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 12, 2020
NY Farm Service Agency to Host Meetings on Coronavirus Food Assistance Program 2

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) in New York is hosting two meetings about the Coronavirus Food Assistance Program 2 (CFAP 2). The first meeting will be Tuesday, November 17th at noon, and the second, which will focus on the specialty crops portion of CFAP 2, will be Wednesday, November 18th at noon. FSA is accepting applications for CFAP 2 through December 11, 2020. To find the latest information on CFAP 2, eligible crops, payment rates, and the application and payment calculator, visit farmers.gov/cfap.


2020 Corn Silage Overview Available

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 5, 2020
2020 Corn Silage Overview Available

2020 Corn Silage Overview Available

-Provided by Joe Lawrence and Allison Kerwin - PRO-DAIRY at Cornell and Department of Animal Science-

The 2020 NY & VT Corn Silage Hybrid Evaluation Program Report is now available.  The growing season across much of the Northeast started out with below average temperatures, but despite the cool start, good growing conditions allowed for a timely fall harvest. Each year brings its own challenges and opportunities. It is important to evaluate the data in the context of your own farm when selecting corn hybrids. The top performing hybrid at any location may not be a good fit for another location or soil type. The PDF version can be accessed here or for additional information about hybrid performance and placement, contact Josh Putman at jap473@cornell.edu or 716-490-5572. 


Important Notice for Licensed Pesticide Applicators!

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 5, 2020
Important Notice for Licensed Pesticide Applicators!

Important Notice for Licensed Pesticide Applicators!

Because of COVID-19, the NYS DEC did not require growers whose licenses expired in November of 2019 or later to renew their applicator's license in order to buy & spray restricted use materials during the 2020 growing season.  That discretionary policy is no longer in effect. If your license expired between November 2019 and Nov. 23, 2020, you must obtain the full number of recertification credits and renew your license.  Starting Nov. 24, 2020, you cannot to buy or apply pesticides until your license has been renewed. The DEC is giving growers a 90-day grace period before adding penalty credits to overdue renewal applications.  Growers should complete COVID-delayed license renewals by February 23, 2021.  If your license expires after Nov. 23, 2020, you will follow the typical DEC renewal process.


Preparing for Dairy Calf Care in Winter

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 5, 2020
Preparing for Dairy Calf Care in Winter

With temperatures dropping and the first snow flying, it is important to confirm farms are ready for the winter. While animal care is a top priority for dairy farms year round, there are some additional considerations to keep in mind during cold months, especially for vulnerable groups like calves. Ensuring our calf care is up to date for the winter season can set them up for success in the future. For more information on preparing calves for winter, read this article or reach out to Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist.


The Importance of Testing Manure

Last Modified: October 29, 2020
The Importance of Testing Manure

Manure nutrients can vary from many different factors. Before applying it to your fields, especially if you're goal is to meet the nutritional needs of your crops, take the moment to get it sampled and tested. This article shares how to do that.


Dairy Market Watch - October 2020

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: October 26, 2020
Dairy Market Watch - October 2020

Dairy Market Watch is an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. Dairy Market Watch is published on the last Tuesday of every month, funded in part by Cornell Pro-Dairy, and is compiled by Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist with the Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops Program.


Corn Diseases and Mycotoxin Contamination of Corn Grain in Southwest New York

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: October 22, 2020
Corn Diseases and Mycotoxin Contamination of Corn Grain in Southwest New York

Mycotoxin is a general term for a poison produced by a fungus and can be toxic when inhaled, absorbed through the skin, or consumed at very low concentration levels. Corn and small grain cereals are especially prone to mycotoxin accumulation in their seed tissue. In the past, it was believed that the fungus affected grain only during the postharvest stage, particularly when grain was stored under suboptimal conditions (hot and humid/moist). Although these factors can promote fungal growth in storage, this occurs during the growing season as well. 


Ten Things You Should Know Before Leasing Land for Solar Development

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: October 22, 2020
Ten Things You Should Know Before Leasing Land for Solar Development

Development of land for solar energy projects is becoming common across the state of New York. These large projects require land leases from landowners, which can extend 40-50 years. While leasing land for solar development can provide supplemental income to a landowner, there are some things to keep in mind before signing your name on the dotted line. Daniel Brockett of Penn State Extension and George Thompson of Wilson, Thompson, and Cisek, LLC, help bring some of these important considerations to light.


Dairy x Beef Use in NY Survey

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: October 21, 2020
Dairy x Beef Use in NY Survey

Do you use Dairy x Beef genetics? Do you work with a farm that does? CCE needs your help! The usage of beef on dairy has steadily grown over the last few years and we are working towards understanding the trends and markets of this strategy in NYS. Please consider filling out this survey: https://cornell.ca1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_4HHU14xa0XN4xg1. Which will take approximately 15 minutes to take. The survey can also be started and accessed later for completion. For questions, please contact Margaret Quaassdorff (maq27@cornell.edu) or Betsy Hicks (bjh246@cornell.edu), Regional Dairy Specialists with Cornell Cooperative Extension.  


Dairy Margin Coverage Program Enrollment for 2021 Began Oct. 13

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: October 13, 2020
Dairy Margin Coverage Program Enrollment for 2021 Began Oct. 13

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) began accepting applications for the Dairy Margin Coverage (DMC) program on Tuesday, October 13, 2020 for 2021 enrollment. Signup runs through Dec. 11, 2020. DMC is a voluntary risk management program that offers protection to dairy producers when the difference between the all-milk price and the average feed price (the margin) falls below a certain dollar amount selected by the producer. DMC payments triggered for seven months in 2019 and three months so far in 2020. For more information, visit farmers.gov DMC webpage, or contact your local USDA Service Center. To locate your local FSA office, visit farmers.gov/service-center-locator.  In the Southwest NY region, the county offices can be reached at: Allegany (585) 268-5133; Cattaraugus (716) 699-2375; Chautauqua (716) 664-2351; Erie (716) 652-1400; Steuben (607) 776-7398. 


Online Dairy Feeder School in English and Spanish Scheduled for November 2020

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: October 13, 2020
Online Dairy Feeder School in English and Spanish Scheduled for November 2020

Cornell Cooperative Extension's Regional Dairy Specialists and Cornell PRO-DAIRY would like to invite dairy producers, employees, and agribusiness professionals across the state to join a webinar focused on management practices for feeding cows and heifers. This virtual learning opportunity will be offered as a two-day event in English on Tuesday, November 3rd and Thursday, November 5th from 1pm - 2:30pm. The same information will be presented in Spanish on Tuesday, November 10th and Thursday, November 12th from 1pm - 2:30pm. Registration is required ahead of time by visiting https://tinyurl.com/y6bqfjyq. Thanks to generous sponsors, registration fees have been covered.


Taking, Preparing, and Submitting a Soil Sample for Testing

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: October 8, 2020
Taking, Preparing, and Submitting a Soil Sample for Testing

Soil testing is the easiest way to identify and quantify nutrient imbalances in our agricultural soils. It will identify major nutrients such as nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium as well as pH, organic matter, and some micronutrients. Following a proper sampling technique is essential to achieving a representative sample, and preparing both the sample and submission form appropriately will allow for complete test results in addition to precise nutrient and liming recommendations. For more information about soil testing or report interpretation, please reach out to Amy Barkley, Livestock and Beginning Farm Specialist at amb544@cornell.edu or (716) 640 - 0844 or Josh Putman, Forage and Field Crop Specialist at jap473@cornell.edu or (716) 490-5572.


Dairy Market Watch - September 2020

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: October 1, 2020
Dairy Market Watch - September 2020

Dairy Market Watch is an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. Dairy Market Watch is published on the last Tuesday of every month, funded in part by Cornell Pro-Dairy, and is compiled by Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist with the Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops Program.


NESARE Invites Applicants for their 2021 Farmer Grant Program

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: September 25, 2020
NESARE Invites Applicants for their 2021 Farmer Grant Program

Northeast SARE is now accepting applications for its Farmer Grant Program. Up to $15,000 is available per project. The online system opens on Oct. 1 and applications are due by 5 p.m. on Nov. 17, 2020. The Farmer Grant Program funds farmers to explore new concepts in sustainable agriculture on production, marketing, labor, farm succession, social capital and other areas through experiments, surveys, prototypes, on-farm demonstrations or other research and education techniques. Grants may not be used to help start or expand farm businesses. Application materials, including detailed instructions and supporting documents, are posted at www.northeastsare.org/FarmerGrant. A webinar on how to apply is scheduled for Tuesday, October 6 from 12pm - 1pm. Please contact Amy Barkley, Livestock and Beginning Farm Specialist, at 716-640-0844 or amb544@cornell.edu if you are interested in applying for a SARE Farmer Grant.


Local Frost Advisories - What it Could Mean for Corn Producers in Southwest New

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: September 24, 2020
Local Frost Advisories - What it Could Mean for Corn Producers in Southwest New

Frost can mean yield loss for crop producers, although the severity of damage varies based on crop maturity, topographical features and local climate conditions. A corn-killing freeze occurs when temperatures fall to 32 F for several hours or 28 F for a few minutes.

 


National Milk Producers Federation CFAP2 Dairy Farm Toolbox

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: September 23, 2020
National Milk Producers Federation CFAP2 Dairy Farm Toolbox

The National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) has released a toolbox for dairy farms looking to apply for the second round of CFAP. The toolbox includes a breakdown of what the latest Coronavirus Food Assistance Program includes for dairy, as well as a link to relevant application resources. Farms seeking one-on-one support with the CFAP 2 application process can call 877-508-8364 to speak directly with a USDA employee ready to offer assistance. Although, it is recommended to first contact your local Farm Service Agency (FSA) office. 


Second Round of Coronavirus Food Assistance Program for Farms Now Available

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: September 23, 2020
Second Round of Coronavirus Food Assistance Program for Farms Now Available

The USDA's Farm Service Agency's (FSA) recently opened the second round of Coronavirus Food Assistance Program (CFAP) for agricultural businesses. If you are an agricultural producer whose operation has been affected by COVID-19, you are likely eligible for this second round of support. FSA will accept applications from September 21 - December 11, 2020 from agricultural businesses for this support. A full list of eligible commodities can be found here. For more information, or to apply, visit www.farmers.gov/cfap or contact your local FSA office. In the Southwest NY region, the county offices can be reached at: Allegany (585) 268-5133; Cattaraugus (716) 699-2375; Chautauqua (716) 664-2351; Erie (716) 652-1400; Steuben (607) 776-7398. 


Lime Guidelines for Field Crops in New York

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: September 17, 2020
Lime Guidelines for Field Crops in New York

Lime Guidelines for Field Crops in New York, written by Quirine M. Ketterings, W. Shaw Reid, and Karl Czymmek

Liming is an essential component of successful pasture and field crop management in the SWNY region. With most of our soils being heavy and acidic, plant growth can suffer. Yields may only weigh in at a fraction of their potential, and stand persistence, in the case of pastures and hay fields, can suffer. Fall is an excellent time of year to apply lime because it allows the material to begin to neutralize pH before the next season. Once soil testing has been completed and a liming recommendation is in hand, it is time to make decisions on the type of lime to use, time of year to apply it, and how it should be applied. This guideline from Cornell's Department of Crop and Soil Sciences explores these questions at length to help with the decision-making process. If you have questions about liming your pastures, reach out to Amy Barkley, Livestock and Beginning Farm Specialist at amb544@cornell.edu or (716) 640 - 0844. Questions on liming field crops can be directed to Josh Putman, Forage and Field Crop Specialist at jap473@cornell.edu or (716) 490-5572.


Dairy Farm Business Summary Highlights Factors Associated with Variations in Ear

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: September 16, 2020

The Dairy Farm Business Summary is a free, voluntary, and confidential program offered by PRO-DAIRY and Cornell Cooperative Extension. PRO-DAIRY's Jason Karszes recently released an overview of 2019 data to highlight trends from farms divided by profitability quartiles. The average rate of return on capital without appreciation increased from 1.1 percent in 2018 to 5.6 percent in 2019. For more information, or to complete a Dairy Farm Business Summary for your own operation, contact Katelyn Walley-Stoll, Farm Business Management Specialist. 


Dialing into your Best Dairy: Neonate Phase

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: September 15, 2020
Dialing into your Best Dairy: Neonate Phase

Many years of research have demonstrated that from birth to weaning is a critical period in the dairy animal's life and the management decisions made during this time could have long term effects on that calf's future performance, health, and productivity. Several key management tips have been highlighted in an article by Casey Havekes and Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialists with the North Country Regional Ag Team and the Southwest NY Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Team. These management strategies should be considered to maximize the success of the neonate period. You can read the full article here or reach out to Alycia Drwencke with questions.


Dialing into your Best Dairy: Reproduction, Gestation and the Dry Period

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: September 15, 2020
Dialing into your Best Dairy: Reproduction, Gestation and the Dry Period

Cornell Cooperative Extension Regional Dairy Management Specialists, Alycia DrwenckeCasey Havekes, and Lindsay Ferlito have put together some considerations for managing your herd. Dialing into your best dairy and reaching your herd's genetic potential includes focusing on reproduction, gestation, and the dry period. For tricks on managing these life stages, check out the full article or reach out to Alycia Drwencke.


Consider Planting Winter Wheat After the Hessian Fly-Free Date

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: September 10, 2020
Consider Planting Winter Wheat After the Hessian Fly-Free Date

As fall approaches, growers should consider the recommended timing for planting winter wheat. For years, the standard recommendation for profitable wheat production in New York has been to plant wheat after the Hessian fly-free date. This recommendation is based on the fact that Hessian fly adults would no longer be alive as there are no remedial measures available to save an infested crop. An article prepared by Ken Wise, with the New York State Integrated Pest Management Program, discusses the recommend timing to plant wheat to avoid injury from the Hessian fly as well as a detailed description about this pest. For more information about winter cereal production, contact Josh Putman at 716-490-5572 or jap473@cornell.edu. 

 


Don't Forget to Complete the 2020 Census!

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: September 3, 2020
Don't Forget to Complete the 2020 Census!

Have you completed the 2020 Census? Completing the 2020 Census will determine where over $675 billion in federal funding is spent in states and communities for the next ten years. When filling out the Census, your personal information is kept confidential by law. Whether it's funding in communities across your state or helping determine the number of seats your state will have in the U.S. House of Representatives—every count makes an equal impact. Be sure you are counted and visit 2020Census.Gov for more information.


Aspirin after calving can provide relief to dairy cows, increase milk production

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: September 2, 2020
Aspirin after calving can provide relief to dairy cows, increase milk production

Recent research from Penn State University, over viewed by DairyBusiness shows benefits to providing pain relief to cows after calving. Dairy cows that received a short course of anti-inflammatory medication after calving had lower metabolic stress and produced more milk than untreated cows, according to researchers, who say the regimen they tested could be adopted more easily by producers than previously studied treatment strategies. For additional details, read the full article or reach out to Dairy Management Specialist, Alycia Drwencke


Corn Silage Harvest

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: September 2, 2020
Corn Silage Harvest

Corn silage harvest is under way in New York. An article recently published by Cornell CALS PRO-DAIRY, describes the Corn Silage Processing Score (CSPS), implementation of kernel processing, and how to monitor processor performance. In a second article, they explain the effect of corn plant characteristics on corn silage processing scores. Listen to the newly published PODCAST series titled "Corn Silage Harvest Considerations."  For more information, contact Field Crops Specialist Josh Putman.


Managing Pinkeye in Cattle

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: August 27, 2020
Managing Pinkeye in Cattle

Pinkeye is a highly contagious disease of cattle, which can cause discomfort for the animal, blindness, and production losses. It develops when the presence of the causative bacterium, Moraxella bovis, couples with environmental factors that weaken the eye, allowing the bacteria to enter and begin the infection. Early identification and treatment are important in addition to Integrated Pest Management (IPM) measures to control face flies, which are known to rapidly spread the disease. For more information on management options, contact Livestock and Beginning Farm Specialist, Amy Barkley, at amb544@cornell.edu or (716) 640-0844.


2020 Changes to New York Farm Labor Laws: Recording & Presentation

Last Modified: August 26, 2020

New York's farm labor laws changed greatly with the 2019 Farm Laborer Fair Labor Practices Act (FLFLPA), the laws changed again this year when several amendments were included in the Budget Act in 2020. On August 17, 2020, Cornell Ag Workforce Development and Northeast Dairy Producers Association (NEDPA) recorded a webinar to help all farmers understand the changes. Find below links to a PDF of the presentation with active links and a recording of "2020 Updates to New York Farm Labor Laws."


NYS Forage Exchange Website Announced

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: August 26, 2020
NYS Forage Exchange Website Announced

The NYS Forage Exchange provides a free system to match potential sellers and buyers of forage within New York State. Sellers can easily register within the system and then post the forage they have available to sell. Potential purchasers can browse the advertisements, and then contact the seller through email for additional information or to complete purchase arrangements.


Onboarding Dairy Employees 2020: Safe, Productive and Engaged from Day One

Last Modified: August 18, 2020
Onboarding Dairy Employees 2020: Safe, Productive and Engaged from Day One

Employee training and retention can be difficult on farms. Cornell Agricultural Workforce Development is seeking dairy farmers to participate in the second year of an onboarding project funded by the New York Farm Viability Institute. Over the next year, the Ag Workforce Development Team will partner with 25 farms in a three-session Zoom series to develop onboarding materials, trainings and methods. If your farm is looking for a way to improve employee retention and increase overall productivity of employees, contact Richard Stup, Cornell Agricultural Workforce Development, at res396@cornell.edu, Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist or Katelyn Walley-Stoll, Farm Business Management Specialist.


USDA Announces Organic Certification Cost Share Program

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: August 13, 2020
USDA Announces Organic Certification Cost Share Program

The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is administering a cost-share program for current organic producers to renew their certifications. Up to 50% of eligible certification costs have the potential to be reimbursed through the program, with a maximum of $500 per certification. More information can be found here: https://www.fsa.usda.gov/Assets/USDA-FSA-Public/usdafiles/FactSheets/organic_certification_cost_share_program-fact_sheet.pdf


Dairy Farm Business Summary Progress Report Released by Cornell PRO-DAIRY

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: August 6, 2020

The fourth and final progress report of the Dairy Farm Business Summary has been released for 2019. As dairy businesses across the state continue to analyze their financial and business performance utilizing the Dairy Farm Business Summary and Analysis Program, updated progress of the farm reports are provided to review the changes that have occurred from 2018 to 2019.

If you are interested in participating in the Dairy Farm Business Summary Program contact Katelyn by calling 716-640-0522. 



Assessing Calf Dehydration by Dr. Jennifer Trout

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: August 5, 2020
Assessing Calf Dehydration by Dr. Jennifer Trout

Dr. Jennifer Trout, Western U.S. Calf and Heifer Technical Pro, offers her insight on identifying dehydration in calves and getting them rehydrated.  Dehydration can be a concern for calves throughout the year. Identifying instances of dehydration early on, and caring for those calves is essential to their ability to recover. For more information on calf care, reach out to Alycia Drwencke, SWNY Dairy Management Specialist. 


Register for the Virtual Cornell Hemp Field Day

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: August 5, 2020
Register for the Virtual Cornell Hemp Field Day

Due to COVID-19 safety restrictions, this year's Hemp Field Day is being presented virtually. Pre-Register now to attend this event!


SWNY Field Crop Chronicle - 8/5/2020

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: August 5, 2020
SWNY Field Crop Chronicle - 8/5/2020

The Southwest NY Diary, Livestock, Field Crops Program is excited to announce a new method of delivering field crop topics and information! 


Dairy Market Watch - July 2020

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 28, 2020
Dairy Market Watch - July 2020

Dairy Market Watch is an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. Dairy Market Watch is published on the last Tuesday of every month, funded in part by Cornell Pro-Dairy, and is compiled by Katelyn Walley-Stoll, Business Management Specialist with the Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops Program.


Heat Stress Webinar Recording - English and Spanish

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 28, 2020
Heat Stress Webinar Recording - English and Spanish

Did you miss the recent heat stress webinars in English and Spanish? Not to worry! You can watch the recordings here:

English-Heat Stress: Key Indicators and Management Strategies

https://youtu.be/j489te77R8U

Spanish-Estrés por Calor en Vacas Lecheras: Señales Claves y Estrategias de Manejo

https://youtu.be/ozFtM62FgP8

For additional information on heat stress, reach out to dairy management specialist, Alycia Drwencke.


A table for two (calves) by Abby Bauer

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 22, 2020
A table for two (calves) by Abby Bauer

Recent research highlighted in the July Hoard's Dairyman Webinar expands on the benefits of group housing calves. Emily Miller-Cushion, associate professor at the University of Florida, has been looking at social housing from the perspective of the calf. The research highlighted in the webinar and article by Abby Bauer, show that calves value social contact and are willing to work for access to it. For additional information on social housing, check out the webinar recording, article, or contact dairy management specialist, Alycia Drwencke


Early-Season Corn Disease: Northern Corn Leaf Blight

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 22, 2020
Early-Season Corn Disease: Northern Corn Leaf Blight

In 2019, northern corn leaf blight (NCLB) appeared throughout the Southwest New York region. Weather conditions in 2020 are favorable and might lead to disease infestations in SWNY.


Don't Miss Out On The Next CORE Pesticide Training July 21st, 6PM-7:50PM!

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 16, 2020
Don't Miss Out On The Next CORE Pesticide Training July 21st, 6PM-7:50PM!

Our first online CORE pesticide training was a huge success with great participation from the group. The SWNY Dairy, Livestock, and Field Crops team is hosting a second training this coming Tuesday, July 21, from 6-7:50PM. 


Heat-Stress and Lack of Moisture on Corn and Soybeans in SWNY

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 16, 2020
Heat-Stress and Lack of Moisture on Corn and Soybeans in SWNY

Last week, SWNY was experiencing severe heat as well as symptoms of drought stress and seen in many crops. Corn leaves were rolling, soybean leaves were flipped, leaf tissue was turning grey, and there was no sight of rain. 


APHIS Seeks Comment on the Transition to RFID Tags as the Only Official Identifi

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 15, 2020
APHIS Seeks Comment on the Transition to RFID Tags as the Only Official Identifi

The USDA's Animal Health and Plant Inspection Service (APHIS) is looking for public comment on their proposal to make Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) tags the only official ear tag approved for use in cattle (dairy, beef, bison) by January 1, 2023 and are seeking input on the proposed timeline for implementation. The transition would phase out metal tags, which are now currently allowed to be used in addition to RFID tags. While there would be no change to the existing regulations, these tags would allow for more accurate disease traceability by APHIS. Public comments will be accepted through October 5th, 2020 by going to: https://www.federalregister.gov/d/2020-14463


Silage Safety Resources

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 15, 2020
Silage Safety Resources

With 2nd cutting of hay well under way or finished and corn silage harvest quickly approaching, it is important to revisit silage safety. Lallemand Animal Nutrition has released a few safety resources for farm this harvest season. They are also willing to perform individualized training on farm. For additional questions on silage safety, reach out to Dairy Management Specialist, Alycia Drwencke or Field Crops Specialist, Josh Putman


Spreading Dogbane - A problematic weed in SWNY

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 6, 2020
Spreading Dogbane - A problematic weed in SWNY

Josh Putman, Field Crops Specialist with the SWNY Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops program recently ran across a plant in a hay field that had not been worked for a few years and was very difficult to identify. Pictures of the weed were sent to Cornell's Weed Ecology and Management Laboratory and correctly identified.  Spreading dogbaneApocynum androsaemifolium, is in the same family as milkweeds and swallowworts, and the same genus as hemp dogbane. This perennial plant is found in open, dry areas and in disturbed habitats throughout New York and most of the US and Canada.


Dialing into Your Best Dairy Podcast Series

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 1, 2020
Dialing into Your Best Dairy Podcast Series

The Dialing into Your Best Dairy Podcast Series is now available. This is podcast series from Cornell Cooperative Extension Regional Dairy Specialists and Cornell CALS PRO-DAIRY. This 8 episode series will discuss management decisions across the different life stages of a dairy cow. Access the podcasts and additional resources at: prodairy.cals.cornell.edu/events/podcasts. You can also contact Alycia Drwencke, for additional information.


Ecological Control of Pasture Flies

Last Modified: June 30, 2020
Ecological Control of Pasture Flies

Pasture flies are more than a mere nuisance; they can result in production losses on cattle, sheep, goats, and other pastured livestock. Around June, the weather is warm enough that so long as there's enough moisture around, the populations of these pests will explode. A robust control program is necessary to prevent these populations from getting out of control. While chemical controls may work now, the flies will build resistance over time. In this article, specialists from the South Central NY Dairy and Field Crops Team review the top three fly pests: face flies, horn files, and stable flies, as well as integrated pest management techniques of pastures and barns to help keep the populations low, thereby reducing the need for chemical control methods.


NYSDOL Updates Guidance FAQ About NY Farm Labor Laws by Richard Stup

Last Modified: June 23, 2020
NYSDOL Updates Guidance FAQ About NY Farm Labor Laws by Richard Stup

Richard Stup with Cornell Agricultural Workforce Development shares updates on the guidance for NY farm labor laws. 

The New York State Department of Labor (NYSDOL) recently released a new set of frequently asked questions (FAQ) that address the 2019 Farm Laborer Fair Labor Practices Act (FLFLPA) and the recent changes to FLFLPA that were made in the New York budget process. Find the FAQ here: https://labor.ny.gov/immigrants/farm-laborers-fair-labor-practices-act/flflpa-frequently-asked-questions.pdf

Pay special attention to the set of questions under the heading "Coverage." This section includes NYSDOL's interpretation of who is a "farm laborer" and who is not. Be aware that being family doesn't just require the common definition of the concept. As question 6 indicates, to be defined as family also requires a certain sense of obligation to the business and that pay is not based on hours or days of work. The law is in effect now but NYSDOL continues to be prevented from enforcing it with respect to family members and other exempt employee by the temporary restraining order issued by a federal judge in Buffalo. This situation will likely continue until the lawsuit is resolved.

Cornell Agricultural Workforce Development and other industry organizations are continuing to seek information and clarification from NYSDOL about important details and questions that the new laws raise.


Back to Basics: Herd Management Lessons from COVID-19

Last Modified: June 17, 2020
Back to Basics: Herd Management Lessons from COVID-19

Betsy HicksLindsay Ferlito, and Margaret Quaassdorff, CCE Regional Dairy Specialists, remind us not to forget the basics when managing cows. During the past few months of COVID-19, many farms have seen the benefits of continuing to focus on aspects of management that can be considered basics. Focusing on these management areas can help make your farm more efficient, even in unstable times. 


Coming Soon: New Podcast from CCE Dairy Educators and PRO-DAIRY

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: June 11, 2020
Coming Soon: New Podcast from CCE Dairy Educators and PRO-DAIRY

A new podcast series from CCE Dairy Educators and PRO-DAIRY titled "Dialing into Your Best Dairy" will be available soon! This 8 episode series will discuss management decisions across the different life stages of a dairy cow. The podcast will be available soon on the PRO-DAIRY website (https://prodairy.cals.cornell.edu/events/podcasts/) where you can find each episode along with additional resources and speaker contact information. For additional resources, reach out to Dairy Management Specialist, Alycia Drwencke.


Black Cutworm and True Armyworm Moth Captures and Weed Pressure in SWNY

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: June 4, 2020
Black Cutworm and True Armyworm Moth Captures and Weed Pressure in SWNY

This week, Field Crops Specialist, Josh Putman, with the Southwest NY Dairy, Livestock, and Field Crops program scouted traps and fields throughout the region. In Avoca, NY, both moth species were present having 7 cutworm and 10 armyworm; not much larvae feeding was found. In Springville, NY 3 black cutworm and 3 armyworm were collected; we now have evidence of cutworm feeding on corn plants. According to Dr. Mike Stanyard of the NWNY Dairy, Livestock, and Field Crops team, it is important to be out scouting your fields now for pest damage and economic threshold that may require management. In addition, with the warm temperatures and increased day length, we are seeing an increase of weed pressure in our field crop production systems. Summer annual weeds compete for sunlight, nutrients and water. Don't let these pests rob your crop yields!


Dung Beetles Aid in Reducing Flies and Gastrointestinal Parasites in Pastures

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: June 4, 2020
Dung Beetles Aid in Reducing Flies and Gastrointestinal Parasites in Pastures

Dung Beetles Aid in Reducing Flies and Gastrointestinal Parasites in Pastures, by Ken Wise, Dr. Mike Baker, and Jaime Cummings

Dung beetles may be unassuming members of pasture ecology, but are excellent managers of nutrients and pasture parasites. Given the right populations and conditions, entire manure pats can be stored and consumed by these insects in 36-48 hours. Under ideal conditions, they can control 95% of horn flies, and not only compete with horn flies, but also gastrointestinal parasites for the manure in the pats. That said, many commonly used pasture pesticides, both internal and external, have active ingredients which have the unintended consequence of being detrimental to dung beetles. In this newly published article, Ken Wise, Livestock and Field Crops IPM Extension Educator, reviews ways to increase dung beetle populations, those pesticides which are less toxic to dung beetle populations, and lists various feed-through insecticides. The article in its entirety can be found here: https://ecommons.cornell.edu/bitstream/handle/1813/69933/dung-beetles-FS-NYSIPM.pdf?sequence=2&isAllowed=y


Navigating Farm Management Changes with Employees by Libby Eiholzer

Last Modified: June 2, 2020
Navigating Farm Management Changes with Employees by Libby Eiholzer

Libby Eiholzer, Bilingual Dairy Specialist with the Northwest NY Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops team shares some key considerations for navigating farm management changes with your employees.


Cutworm and Armyworm Moth Captures Increase Significantly in Southwest NY

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: May 28, 2020
Cutworm and Armyworm Moth Captures Increase Significantly in Southwest NY

Field Crops Specialist, Josh Putman, with the Southwest NY Dairy, Livestock, and Field Crops program scouted traps and fields throughout the region. This week, moth captures increased significantly at both locations in the  region. In Avoca, NY, both moth species were present having 13 cutworm and 11 armyworm. Higher numbers were captured in Springville, NY with 21 black cutworm and 13 armyworm collected; no evident feeding from larvae was present in corn fields that were emerged. Field Crops Specialists from the Northwest NY Program are finding much higher numbers of both pests in their traps this week. Correct identification of the larvae and larvae feeding can be difficult; contact your local extension specialist for proper identification and management.


Considerations for identifying and abating heat load in cattle

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: May 26, 2020
Considerations for identifying and abating heat load in cattle

While winter held out as long as it could, spring has arrived in a hurry and with it, much warmer temperatures. These increased temperatures are great for planting fields and harvesting forage, but are less ideal for our cattle. Some important considerations for identifying and abating heat load in cattle can help improve profitability within your herd. To learn more about heat abatement efficiency and utilizing cow-based indicators, reach out to our Dairy Management Specialist, Alycia Drwencke.


Dairy Market Watch - May 2020

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: May 26, 2020
Dairy Market Watch - May 2020

Dairy Market Watch is an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. Dairy Market Watch is published on the last Tuesday of every month, funded in part by Cornell Pro-Dairy, and is compiled by Katelyn Walley-Stoll, Business Management Specialist with the Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops Program.


On-Farm Dairy Processing Webinar Recording

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: May 21, 2020
On-Farm Dairy Processing Webinar Recording

This recording is from a free on-farm dairy processing webinar hosted on May 21st, 2020 by Cornell Cooperative Extensions Southwest NY Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops, and Harvest New York Programs with New York State's Department of Agriculture and Market's Division of Milk Control and Dairy Services. This is for dairy farmers who are interested in diversifying or vertically integrating their business. An introduction of factors to keep in mind when considering dairy processing for a farm's operation. This overview will focus on business considerations and a brief summary of regulatory requirements.


Monitoring Your Alfalfa Fields for Weevil

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: May 20, 2020
Monitoring Your Alfalfa Fields for Weevil

Despite this cold, wet spring, which has delayed planting and other farming efforts across NY, our pests and diseases continue to rear their ugly heads. This serves as a reminder that we need to continue to be vigilant with our scouting efforts for early detection of pests to make sound management decisions.


Soil Temperatures and Insect Captures Remain Low in Southwest New York

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: May 14, 2020
Soil Temperatures and Insect Captures Remain Low in Southwest New York

As daytime temperatures struggle to get above 50 F and nighttime temperatures falling below freezing, soils in Southwest NY are warming at a slow pace. Average soil temperatures across the SWNY region ranged from 42-56 F. Black cutworm and true armyworm moth counts also remain low as Avoca, NY had 0 black cutworm and 2 armyworm. Springville, NY location had 2 black cutworm and 3 armyworm moths in the traps. Weekly monitoring of these pests will continue and as temperatures continue to rise, we need to be scouting our fields for potential larvae. Contact Field Crop Specialist, Josh Putman, with the SWNY Dairy, Livestock, and Field Crops team for correct pest identification. For additional information, see the Crop Alert provided by the NWNY Diary, Livestock and Field Crops team.


Modern On Farm Preparedness Webinars

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: May 8, 2020
Modern On Farm Preparedness Webinars

The PRO-DAIRY team and Regional Dairy Specialists collaborated on hosting on farm preparedness programs. Several webinars from the programming, which too place in early 2020, are now available.


Caught! Black Cutworm and True Armyworm Moths Making Their Way into Southwest Ne

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: May 7, 2020
Caught! Black Cutworm and True Armyworm Moths Making Their Way into Southwest Ne

Black cutworm and True armyworm are problematic insects that can significantly cause damage here in New York. We are working to monitor these moths as they enter the region.


It's That Time of Year - Managing to Prevent Grass Tetany

Last Modified: May 7, 2020
It's That Time of Year - Managing to Prevent Grass Tetany

Grass tetany, or hypomagnesemia, is a potentially fatal condition classified by low blood magnesium and is exacerbated by the consumption of low-magnesium forages. This article written by Dr. Mike Baker further explains the biology, risk factors in both animals and pastures, and practical prevention methods.


Cow Comfort Webinar Recordings

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: May 6, 2020
Cow Comfort Webinar Recordings

During the winter of 2019, the PRO-DAIRY team and regional dairy specialists hosted several cow comfort workshops. Two portions of the workshops are now available as webinar recordings.


Robots show value in feed efficiency, reduced labor, by Tim Terry

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: May 6, 2020
Robots show value in feed efficiency, reduced labor, by Tim Terry

Timothy Terry, who has recently joined PRO-DAIRY staff as a Farm Strategic Planning Specialist, is publishing a series on Evaluating Robotics: Consistently feeding and milking in a robotic system can improve cow performance in American Agriculturalist. If you're thinking of switching to a robotic dairying system, think about the benefits in feed efficiency, cow management and labor, and whether those outweigh the costs of putting a system in.


Cornell Pesticide Management Education Program

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 29, 2020

Along with the increased use of disinfectants and sanitizers during the COVID-19 pandemic,

there has been an increase in adverse health effects from the misuse of these
products. There have also been several fraudulent products produced during this
time that potential applicators should be made aware of. 


Dairy Market Watch - April 2020

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 29, 2020
Dairy Market Watch - April 2020

Dairy Market Watch is an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. Dairy Market Watch is published on the last Tuesday of every month, funded in part by Cornell Pro-Dairy, and is compiled by Katelyn Walley-Stoll, Business Management Specialist with the Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops Program.


Beef Market Update, April 16th, 2020

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 23, 2020
Beef Market Update, April 16th, 2020

On April 16, 2016, Dr. Mike Baker, Betsy Hodge, and Bill Bullock shared a marketing update for the beef industry. At this time, the industry is reporting revenue losses and decreased capacity for processing in response to decreased demand and the implementation of measures which safeguard employee health. For those who have cattle which are ready for market, recommendations for different classes of cattle were discussed.

For the latest NYS beef cattle market information, visit the Cornell Beef Management website: https://blogs.cornell.edu/beefcattle/market-information/.


Calf Tube Feeding Protocol

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 23, 2020
Calf Tube Feeding Protocol

Maureen Hanson with Bovine Veterinarian has put together a protocol on best management for tube feeding calves.


Creating a Dairy Farm Operating Plan

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 23, 2020
Creating a Dairy Farm Operating Plan

Traps being set in Southwest New York

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 21, 2020
Traps being set in Southwest New York

Black cutworm and True armyworm traps are being set throughout Southwest NY to monitor moth flights from the south as well as the west. These can be very problematic to field crop and hay producers and it is important to monitor your fields before they cause economic damage. Recently, other Extension Specialists have caught True armyworm moths and we will continue to monitor the traps that are being placed in SWNY.


USCIS Gives H-2A Workers Temporary Flexibility to Stay and Work Longer

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 21, 2020
USCIS Gives H-2A Workers Temporary Flexibility to Stay and Work Longer

Cornell Agricultural Workforce Development has shared some of the key excerpts on H-2A updates. Notice was published in the Federal register on Monday that gives H-2A workers temporary flexibility to stay and work longer in the United States.


Diet and Management Considerations for Emergencies: Reducing Milk Flow

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 20, 2020
Diet and Management Considerations for Emergencies: Reducing Milk Flow

Financial Considerations - Are You Milking Some Cows You Shouldn't Be?

Last Modified: April 20, 2020
Financial Considerations - Are You Milking Some Cows You Shouldn't Be?

Joan Sinclair Petzen, John Hanchar, both NWNY Dairy, Livestock, and Field Crops Team, and Andrew Novakovic, Cornell University, have put together some financial considerations for the number of cows you are milking and managing during these challenging times. 


Face Covering Required for Essential Workers With Direct Public Contact

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 17, 2020
Face Covering Required for Essential Workers With Direct Public Contact

"For all essential businesses or entities, any employees who are present in the workplace shall be provided and shall wear face coverings when in direct contact with customers or members of the public. Businesses must provide, at their expense, such face coverings for their employees. This provision may be enforced by local governments or local law enforcement as if it were an order pursuant to section 12 or 12-b of the Public Health Law.  This requirement shall be effective Wednesday, April 15 at 8 p.m."


What's With All of the Milk Dumping?

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 17, 2020
What's With All of the Milk Dumping?

The Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock, and Field Crops Program would like to reassure the region's consumers that there is no reason for concern regarding the safety of our food system or threats of food shortages. This has been supported by the Institute for Food Safety at Cornell University. Farms nationwide, including dairies, have been deemed essential businesses and are still working daily to produce safe, wholesome foods that families can enjoy - even during this uncertain time. By Katelyn Walley-Stoll and Alycia Drwencke. 


Attention Crop Farmers: Fertilizer Value of Milk

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 16, 2020

Significant quantities of surplus milk from NY's dairy industry may have to be land applied in the coming weeks due to unprecedented market disruptions created by the COVID-19 emergency. Karl Czymmek of Cornell PRO-DAIRY shares helpful information for crop farmers.


Fertilizer Value of Milk and Feeding Milk

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 16, 2020
Fertilizer Value of Milk and Feeding Milk

With many farms being faced with the unfortunate situation of dumping their milk, some farms are considering the value of this milk for fertilizer and as feed for calves and cows. Karl CzymmekCornell PRO-DAIRY Specialist discusses the nutrient value of milk as fertilizer, while Maggie Gilles, Associate Editor for Hoard's Dairyman, shares resources on feeding milk to the herd. 


How warm are your soils? Things to consider prior to planting

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 15, 2020
How warm are your soils? Things to consider prior to planting

Selection of optimal planting date is one of the most critical factors in the decision making process for producers. When making this decision, producers should consider soil temperatures rather than just calendar dates. How warm are your soils?


Management Strategies During COVID-19 from PRO-DAIRY

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 13, 2020
Management Strategies During COVID-19 from PRO-DAIRY

Several resources have been put together by the Cornell PRO-DAIRY team and Cornell CALS Faculty to cover management and financial considerations for dairy farms during COVID-19.


New COVID-19 Resources and Guidance for Farm Workers

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 13, 2020
New COVID-19 Resources and Guidance for Farm Workers

A video in Spanish is available to discuss COVID-19 with your employees. Additionally, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have issued new guidance for employees exposed to COVID-19. These and other resources have been compiled by Cornell Agricultural Workforce Development


NYS DEC delays enforcement of the pesticide certification period

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 8, 2020
NYS DEC delays enforcement of the pesticide certification period

Pesticide Certification and Business Registration during Pause-NY: DEC is taking the following actions to temporarily allow regulatory flexibility and continued pesticide application and business operations during Pause-NY due to the unique conditions facing New York and the entire nation.



Reliable Resources for Spanish- & English-Speaking Farmworkers about COVID-19

Last Modified: April 8, 2020
Reliable Resources for Spanish- & English-Speaking Farmworkers about COVID-19

From our Team to Yours: COVID-19 Resources for Dairy Farmers

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 7, 2020
From our Team to Yours: COVID-19 Resources for Dairy Farmers

The South Central NY Dairy and Field Crops Team has compiled a list of articles that we think may be useful to dairy producers and their service providers as we all navigate the COVID-19 situation. Please stay safe and reach out to our team if you have questions or need help finding information. We are here to help with tools and resources to support all of the normal day-to-day dairy, livestock, and field crop management considerations, in addition to emerging topics related to COVID-19. For additional resources or information, please reach out to Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist, or Katelyn Walley-Stoll, Farm Business Management Specialist.


Scout your hay fields to assess winter annual weed pressure

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 7, 2020
Scout your hay fields to assess winter annual weed pressure

Alfalfa and grass hay stands are greening up across Southwest NY and all across Western NY over the last 10 days. Recently, Field Crops Specialist Josh Putman with the SWNY Dairy, Livestock, and Field Crops Team, has been out monitoring fields for potentially damaging pests in hay production fields. Winter annual weeds are being seen in high numbers and even more so in older hay stands.


Vendor Finance in the Northeast Dairy Industry

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 7, 2020
Vendor Finance in the Northeast Dairy Industry

Originally published in farmdocDAILY by Chad Fiechter and Jennifer Ifft. Many dairy farms report difficult accessing credit when milk prices are low and use of accounts payable with feed mills as management strategy for low margin periods. Through cooperation with NEAFA, we conducted a survey of feed manufacturers, ultimately collecting details of 5 years of accounts receivable data from firms that represent over 70% of the industry by volume. We found that average delinquencies (share of accounts receivable that are overdue) held by NE feed manufacturers have more than doubled since 2014 to over 10%. The magnitude of this "effective credit" is similar to a large regional community bank. This corresponds with a long period of negative profit margins for many dairy farms. We confirm this countercyclical relationship with Cornell Dairy Farm Business Summary data from 1993. We found that dairy farms have a large increase in accounts payable when profit margins are low, especially during the recent/ongoing downturn. Use of accounts payable as "effective credit" is much more common among highly leveraged farms, suggesting higher than average risk for feed manufacturers.


Dairy Farm Risk Management Options April 2020

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 6, 2020

Christopher Wolf, Cornell University, shares risk management options for dairy farms to consider to reduce the impact of milk price decreases.  


Do's and Don'ts for Dairy Farmers When Facing Financial Difficulty

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 6, 2020
Do's and Don'ts for Dairy Farmers When Facing Financial Difficulty

A quick outline for dairy farmers to use in times of financial uncertainty, prepared by Wayne Knoblauch, Cornell University, and Jason Karszes, PRO-DAIRY. 


Key Considerations for Calf Care

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 6, 2020
Key Considerations for Calf Care

Early life care of calves can have long term effects on the health and productivity animals on your farm. By taking into consideration key areas of care, you can promote a healthier, more productive calf and cow. 


Note from ADA North East Regarding Milk Sale Limits at Retail Locations

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 3, 2020
Note from ADA North East Regarding Milk Sale Limits at Retail Locations

Are you still seeing grocery stores limiting dairy purchases? Let the American Dairy Association North East know! 


The State of Dairy Markets

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 3, 2020
The State of Dairy Markets

A message from Katelyn Walley-Stoll, Farm Business Management Specialist with Cornell University Cooperative Extension's Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock, and Field Crops Program:

A lot of people have been asking me about all of the photos and videos going around of milk being dumped. This is a long, but explanatory article from two industry experts, with some tips and things for farms to think about in these uncertain times. At the end of the day, remember that our food supply is safe, you will still be able to buy milk, and farmers keep farming. Keep our farmer's in your thoughts and buy a couple extra blocks of American Made cheese or tubs of ice cream. Don't forget, I put together a monthly report called Dairy Market Watch that is an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. To subscribe, click here and enter your contact information. Stay safe - Katelyn.


Considerations for Dumping Milk

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 2, 2020
Considerations for Dumping Milk

With reports of milk being dumped from some farms across the state and nation, there are a few considerations to keep in mind should your farm or cooperative unfortunately end up in this situation.


Dairy Responding to COVID-19 Podcast by PRO-DAIRY

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 2, 2020
Dairy Responding to COVID-19 Podcast by PRO-DAIRY

Rob Lynch and Kathy Barrett with Cornell PRO-DAIRY, interview industry representatives and producers, on the topic of Dairy Responding to COVID-19 in a limited series podcast.


Don't send cows to market that are not fit to transport, Dr. Mike Baker

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: April 2, 2020
Don't send cows to market that are not fit to transport, Dr. Mike Baker

Dr. Mike Baker, Cornell Beef Extension Specialist, reminds us to check for fitness of transport prior to sending cattle to market in his blog. Included are links to useful resources for determining fitness for transport, such as a checklist developed by Dr. Baker and Rob Lynch, DVM, PRO-DAIRY.


Robotic Milking: Routine Flexibility by Margaret Quaassdorff

Last Modified: April 2, 2020
Robotic Milking: Routine Flexibility by Margaret Quaassdorff

Margaret Quaassdorff, Dairy Management Specialist on the Northwest NY Dairy, Livestock, and Field Crops Team, shares some highlights from the Automated Milking System discussion groups she has been facilitating.


Impact of Beef Processing Plant Closures

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: March 31, 2020

Impact of Beef Processing Plant Closures, written by Dr. Mike Baker

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, large processing plants servicing NY beef producers have made changes to allocations of which and how many beef animals are harvested to meet current consumer demand. As of Monday, March 30th, positive tests among plant workers have resulted in a temporary closure of one of the region's most prominent processing plants, JBS, in Souderton, PA. In response, Dr. Mike Baker of Cornell University wrote this article, which explores what this means for farmers, while giving recommendations of best management practices to get producers through this transition period. Read the full article here


Biosecurity for People: 7 Steps to Protect Farm Workers from COVID-19

Last Modified: March 30, 2020
Biosecurity for People: 7 Steps to Protect Farm Workers from COVID-19

Mary Kate Wheeler, Farm Business Management Specialist with the South Central NY Dairy & Field Crops Team, shares 7 tips for protecting your farm employees from COVID-19 in her latest blog post


Traps being set for black cutworm and armyworm - Watch your fields!

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: March 30, 2020
Traps being set for black cutworm and armyworm - Watch your fields!

True armyworm (aka Common armyworm) is a problem in agronomic and turf production systems here in New York. They do not overwinter in New York, but fly north from states to our south in the spring. Armyworm moth migrations are somewhat sporadic, cyclic from year to year, and difficult to predict. We are gearing up to set traps throughout the region to help growers predict the potential risk of armyworm infestation in wheat and corn this spring.


Achieving a better price for you beef or dairy feeder cattle, Dr. Michael Baker

Last Modified: March 23, 2020
Achieving a better price for you beef or dairy feeder cattle, Dr. Michael Baker

Recently, Dr. Michael Baker, Cornell University Beef Extension Specialist, shared some ideas on how you can add value to your calves. The full report can be found here.


COVID-19 and Your Dairy Webinar

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: March 23, 2020
COVID-19 and Your Dairy Webinar

Richard Stup, PhD, Cornell Agricultural Workforce Development, and Rob Lynch, DVM, Cornell CALS PRO-DAIRY hosted a webinar recently discussing COVID-19 and Your Dairy, which is now available online with additional resources.


Dairy Market Watch - March 2020

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: March 23, 2020
Dairy Market Watch - March 2020

Dairy Market Watch is an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. Dairy Market Watch is published on the last Tuesday of every month, funded in part by Cornell Pro-Dairy, and is compiled by Katelyn Walley-Stoll, Business Management Specialist with the Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops Program.


Video describing COVID-19 in Spanish

Last Modified: March 20, 2020
Video describing COVID-19 in Spanish

The Cornell Farm Worker Program has put together a video describing COVID-19 in Spanish.


NY FarmNet Continues to Offer Free Services - Call 1-800-547-3276

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: March 19, 2020
NY FarmNet Continues to Offer Free Services - Call 1-800-547-3276

NY FarmNet is continuing to support our agricultural producers through free and confidential consultations. 


Cornell PRODAIRY and Cornell Cooperative Extension of NWNY Spanish Dairy Webinar

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: March 9, 2020
Cornell PRODAIRY and Cornell Cooperative Extension of NWNY Spanish Dairy Webinar

The Cornell PRO-DAIRY Program and the Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops Team are collaborating on a two part Spanish speaking webinar series on milk quality taking place March 25th and April 29th. 


Elements of IPM for Dairy and Beef Cattle by Ken Wise & Keith Waldron

Last Modified: February 28, 2020
Elements of IPM for Dairy and Beef Cattle by Ken Wise & Keith Waldron

Ken Wise and Keith Waldron, with the New York Integrated Pest Management Program share useful resources for incorporating IPM on your farm. IMP can be used to help control fly populations on dairy and beef cattle farms. 


Meeting the Continuing Education Requirements of FARM Program Version 4.0

Last Modified: February 28, 2020
Meeting the Continuing Education Requirements of FARM Program Version 4.0

Lindsay Ferlito, Dairy Management Specialist with the North Country Regional Ag Team discusses how you can fulfill the continuing education aspect of FARM Version 4.0. As of January 1, 2020, all non-family and family employees with animal care responsibilities must be provided with continuing education opportunities. 


National Dairy FARM Program Version 4.0 Updates by Lindsay Ferlito

Last Modified: February 28, 2020
National Dairy FARM Program Version 4.0 Updates by Lindsay Ferlito

Lindsay Ferlito, Dairy Management Specialist with the North Country Regional Ag Team shares updates on the National Dairy FARM Program Version 4.0. This version of the FARM program went into effect on January 1, 2020.


Resources to Help Train Your Dairy Employees with Animal Care Responsibilities

Last Modified: February 28, 2020
Resources to Help Train Your Dairy Employees with Animal Care Responsibilities

Betsy Hicks, Area Dairy Specialist with the South Central New York Dairy & Field Crops Team shares useful resources to aid in training employees with animal care responsibilities. These resources can be used to fulfill the continuing education aspect of FARM 4.0.


Stockmanship Training with Curt Pate: It's All about Pressure

Last Modified: February 28, 2020
Stockmanship Training with Curt Pate:  It's All about Pressure

Lindsay Ferlito, Dairy Management Specialist with the North Country Regional Ag Team, and Betsy Hicks, Area Dairy Specialist with the South Central New York Dairy & Field Crops Team, provide useful information on stockmanship. This article can be used towards the FARM 4.0 stockmanship continuing education requirement


Corn Diseases in Southwest NY

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 27, 2020
Corn Diseases in Southwest NY

2019 was a year for many diseases. Here are a few things to keep in mind going into the 2020 growing season!


Particle size matters for high-straw dry cow diets by Casey Havekes

Last Modified: February 27, 2020
Particle size matters for high-straw dry cow diets by Casey Havekes

Casey Havekes, Dairy Management Specialist on the North Country Regional Ag Team, and Trevor DeVries, Professor and Canada Research Chair at the University of Guelph, discuss the importance of particle size in dry cow diets in a recent article for Progressive Dairy.


Dairy Market Watch - February 2020

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 26, 2020
Dairy Market Watch - February 2020

February 2020 edition of Dairy Market Watch, an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. 


CORE Pesticide Training & NYSDEC Exam 2020

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 21, 2020
CORE Pesticide Training & NYSDEC Exam 2020

3.0 pesticide recertification credits in the CORE category have been officially approved for this event. Attend a CORE Pesticide training and register to take your NYSDEC Exam. Participants looking to receive their applicators license must have experience working on their own farm, or through employment on another farm. March 26th - Jamestown. April 2nd - Bath


You Don't Say...By Timothy X. Terry, Harvest NY

Last Modified: February 21, 2020
You Don't Say...By Timothy X. Terry, Harvest NY

Learn more about hiring a contractor for your farm project from Timothy X. Terry of Cornell Cooperative Extension's Harvest NY program. 


Feeding More Milk to Make More Milk

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 14, 2020
Feeding More Milk to Make More Milk

Dr. Valerie Smith with The Dean Foods Stewardship Program discusses why feeding calves more milk can make you more milk.


Tips on Recruiting and Retaining Quality Employees on your Dairy Farm

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: February 14, 2020
Tips on Recruiting and Retaining Quality Employees on your Dairy Farm

Libby Eiholzer of the Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops Program shares information on retaining employees with DairyBusiness.


Dairy Market Watch - January 2020

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: January 28, 2020
Dairy Market Watch - January 2020

January 2020 edition of Dairy Market Watch, an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. 


An Update from SWNYDLFC

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: January 23, 2020
An Update from SWNYDLFC

Since July 1st, 2019, our new program has been busy with on-boarding, needs assessment, educational programming, and getting the chance to meet some of our region's amazing farmers. We've hired four specialists that are on-board and ready to hit the ground running in the specialty areas of Farm Business Management, Field Crops, Dairy Management, and Livestock. We're working with each of our five county associations' Executive Directors, Board of Directors, Program Committees, and Agriculture Program Staff to get to know the region and its programming needs while introducing this collaborative model of dairy, livestock, and field crops outreach.

 


Dairy Market Watch - December 2019

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: December 17, 2019
Dairy Market Watch - December 2019

December 2019 edition of Dairy Market Watch, an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. 


Dairy Market Watch - November 2019

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 27, 2019
Dairy Market Watch - November 2019

November 2019 edition of Dairy Market Watch, an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. 


Palmer Amaranth Confirmed in Southwest New York

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: November 18, 2019
Palmer Amaranth Confirmed in Southwest New York

Palmer amaranth is one of the most problematic weed species in the United States. Its biology and ability to become resistant to several classes of herbicides make it very difficult to control in production systems.


Reducing the Risk of Compaction When Grazing Cover Crops

Nancy Glazier, Small Farms & Livestock Specialist
Northwest New York Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops

Last Modified: October 31, 2019
Reducing the Risk of Compaction When Grazing Cover Crops

The benefits of cover crops have been known for many

years; one is remediating compaction. 


Dairy Market Watch - October 2019

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: October 30, 2019
Dairy Market Watch - October 2019

October 2019 edition of Dairy Market Watch, an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. 


Dairy Market Watch - September 2019

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: October 2, 2019
Dairy Market Watch - September 2019

September 2019 edition of Dairy Market Watch, an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry. 


Dairy Market Watch - August 2019

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: August 27, 2019
Dairy Market Watch - August 2019

Dairy Market Watch is an educational newsletter to keep producers informed of changing market factors affecting the dairy industry.


Confidently Hosting a Farm Tour - Part One - What's Your "Why Bother" ?

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: August 14, 2019
Confidently Hosting a Farm Tour - Part One - What's Your

We've been approached by many agricultural producers who are interested in hosting a farm tour, but are unsure of where to start. Our hope is that this article series will help our agricultural community share the stories of their farms, and feel confident while doing so. 

 


The Muddy Boot Weed Seed Dispersal Method

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: August 14, 2019
The Muddy Boot Weed Seed Dispersal Method

Tall waterhemp is one of the most problematic weed species throughout the Midwest and has now arrived and spread to eight counties in Upstate New York. Waterhemp can spread from field-to-field and farm-to-farm on equipment, clothing, application equipment, or via water from over flooded ditches and rivers. Following a recent field day event we wanted to demonstrate the amount of weed seed that could travel back with you.

 


Dairy Market Watch - June 2019

Katelyn Walley, Business Management Specialist and Team Leader
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 16, 2019
Dairy Market Watch - June 2019

June 2019 edition of Dairy Market Watch.




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