From our Team to Yours: COVID-19 Resources for Dairy Farmers

Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

April 7, 2020
From our Team to Yours: COVID-19 Resources for Dairy Farmers

The South Central NY Dairy and Field Crops Team has compiled a list of articles that we think may be useful to dairy producers and their service providers as we all navigate the COVID-19 situation. Please stay safe and reach out to our team if you have questions or need help finding information. We are here to help with tools and resources to support all of the normal day-to-day dairy, livestock, and field crop management considerations, in addition to emerging topics related to COVID-19.

 

Health, Safety and COVID-19 Prevention

Biosecurity for People: 7 Steps to Protect Farm Workers from COVID-19

By Mary Kate Wheeler, Cornell Cooperative Extension South Central NY Dairy and Field Crops Team

To manage the human risks associated with COVID-19, every farm operator should be thinking about two things right now: prevention and contingency planning. This article addresses prevention, otherwise known as "biosecurity for people." Use these seven steps as a guide to develop your own biosecurity program aimed at keeping your farm workforce safe, healthy and productive.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Prevention and Management Dairy Farmer Handbook

National Milk Producers Federation

Dairy farms are 24-hour, 7-day per week business and operations must continue. Following U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) precautions will minimize the risk to dairy farmers, family, employees and essential professional and service providers to be on the farm.

What You Need To Know About Coronavirus (COVID-19) on Your Dairy (English Infographic)

Alltec

Print and post this infographic where your farm workers can see it to inform them about the coronavirus and the steps they should take to protect themselves and their coworkers at the dairy.

Lo que necesita saber del coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) en su lechería (infografía en español)

Alltech

Imprima y publique esta infografía donde los trabajadores de su granja puedan verla para informarles sobre el coronavirus y los pasos que deben seguir para protegerse a sí mismos y a sus compañeros de trabajo en la lechería.

Guidance on Preparing Workplaces for COVID-19

Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

To reduce the impact of COVID-19 outbreak conditions on businesses, workers, customers, and the public, it is important for all employers to plan now for COVID-19. Lack of continuity planning can result in a cascade of failures as employers attempt to address challenges of COVID-19 with insufficient resources and workers who might not be adequately trained for jobs they may have to perform under pandemic conditions.

 

Economic Impacts and Policy Response

Dairy Market Updates - April 1st 2020

By Andrew Novacovic, PhD, Cornell University and Mark Stephenson, PhD, University of Wisconsin

National experts on dairy markets Andrew Novakovic and Mark Stephenson discuss the implications of COVID-19 on consumer demand, dairy processing, and prices. Andy is a Cornell University Professor of Agriculture Economics Emeritus, and Mark is the Director of Dairy Policy Analysis at the University of Wisconsin. They share their thoughts on what dairy operators should be thinking about now, and how they can prepare for a possible low price cycle.

Impact of Processing Plant Closures

By Michael Baker, PhD, Beef Cattle Management Program, Cornell University

What we know as of 3/30/2020: JBS in Souderton, PA closed due to confirmation of two COVID-19 cases. About 75% of their daily harvest was devoted to finished cattle and 25% to cull cows and bulls. Recently Cargill in Wyalusing, PA made the decision to only process cull cows and bulls. As of the date of this writing they are still in operation.

COVID-19 Employee Leave and Farm Employers

By Richard Stup and Elizabeth Higgins, Cornell University

Both the U.S. and New York governments passed COVID-19 related legislation in recent weeks affecting employee leave from work. These programs are designed to protect jobs and provide additional sources of income for employees and their families during the current pandemic. This post is intended to help clarify the new federal and state programs and how they interact with each other.

CARES Act's Emergency Resources for Farm Businesses: Paycheck Protection Loan Program

By Elizabeth Higgins, Cornell Cooperative Extension Eastern NY Commercial Hort Team

The recent CARES Act provided additional emergency funding through Small Business Administration (SBA) for businesses who are facing losses due to COVID-19.  If you are a farm business, the most important program to be aware of right now is the Paycheck Protection Loan Program, which was authorized in the CARES Act. Farms that meet SBA small business thresholds are eligible to apply for this low interest, forgivable loan program.

 

Dairy Farm Business Management

COVID-19 Response: Leadership, Planning, and Communication/Collaboration

By Dr. Bob Milligan, LearningEdge Monthly

I have been visiting with clients and colleagues and thinking about how to respond to our COVID-19 crisis. My wife and I are hunkered down as we are among the vulnerable and are in position to isolate. This issue is a series of short articles focused around what I think are the three keys to navigating this crisis. They are: Leadership, Planning, Communication and Collaboration.

Updated: Do's and Don'ts for Dairy Farmers when Facing Financial Difficulty

By Professor Wayne Knoblauch and Jason Karszes, Cornell PRO-DAIRY

This is a revised Do's and Don'ts list for dairy farmers during times of financial stress that was originally published back in 2018. With the increasing likelihood of considerable financial stress in agriculture this year, this might be an easy read to help focus on some critical things as different decision need to be made.

Dairy Farm Risk Management Options - April 2020

By Christopher Wolf, PhD, Cornell University

Before news of coronavirus became widespread, the futures markets showed signs that 2020 would be a recovery year for the dairy industry. Class III milk futures were between $17.75 and $18.25 per hundredweight from February through December 2020. However, milk futures fell as the coronavirus spread. As of April 6, Class III futures for May had fallen to $12.58 per hundredweight. In this article, Christopher Wolf, Cornell University Professor of Applied Economics, discusses the various price risk management options available to dairy producers in the context of COVID-19.

Progress of the Dairy Farm Report #3: Selected Financial and Production Factors

By Jason Karszes, Lauren Hill and Wayne Knoblauch, Cornell Dairy Farm Business Summary & Analysis Program

This is the third Progress Report summarizing Selected Financial and Production Factors with data from 135 NY farms who participated in the 2019 Dairy Farm Business Summary. The report presents averages from all farms, and from four different sub-groups based on herd size: less than 450 cows, 450 to 899 cows, 900 to 1,399 cows, and greater than 400 cows.

 

Stress Management and Mental Health

Managing Stress in Unprecedented Times

By Jan Kirshenbaum, MSW, NY FarmNet Consultantand Kate Downes, NY FarmNet Outreach Director

Whatever our age, a life-altering event can leave us hoping there is some magical cure that will help us feel less bad: "If only I read the right book/ hear the right sermon/ go to the right workshop, I can learn how to feel less bad." Unfortunately, no magic exists in this situation. Amplifying our fears is the fact that the ultimate "grown-ups"—the President, governors, hospital administrators—are telling us there will be no quick solutions to this situation, and it may get worse before it gets better. Taking all of that into consideration, there are a few things to keep in mind.

Managing Financial Stress on the Farm in Uncertain Times

By Ed Staehr, Executive Director, NY FarmNet

Current economic uncertainty related to COVID-19 is resulting in stress for many farmers. Normal consumer patterns of expenditures on food away from home have been altered, as restaurants are limiting service to take out and consumers are staying home. For the dairy industry, consumers are purchasing more fluid milk; however, this may not fully offset reduced demand in cheese utilized by restaurants and milk provided by schools. Stress cannot be avoided; nonetheless, one can take steps to identify stressors and manage them by putting together a plan for the future.


For additional resources or information, please reach out to Alycia Drwencke, Dairy Management Specialist, or Katelyn Walley-Stoll, Farm Business Management Specialist.




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calendar of events

Upcoming Events

Food Industry Virtual Office Hours

July 9, 2020
4pm-5pm

Food Industry Virtual Office Hours

Thursday, July 9, 2020 | 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm (EDT)

Join us for our weekly Q&A and facilitated discussions during our Food Industry Virtual Office Hours to address questions on COVID-19. Speak directly to subject matter experts in sanitation, epidemiology, microbiology, virology, food safety culture, business continuity and the food safety of dairy foods, fresh fruits and vegetables, and processed foods and beverages.

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Marketing Workshop for Fiber Farmers and Fiber Artists

July 11, 2020
9:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Join Laura Biasillo from Broom County Cooperative Extension for a morning of discussion on marketing fiber on July 11th from 9:00AM - 11:30AM. This workshop includes the topics of marketing strategies, how to conduct market research, creating a plan to reach customers, and networking with local fiber farmers and makers. The workshop will be held over Zoom and will be $20 to attend. More about this event and the registration link can be found here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/localfiber-marketing-workshop-tickets-90854071975
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Tick IPM #3: Asian Longhorned Tick IPM

July 13, 2020
11:00 am

The Asian longhorned tick (ALT) is a threat to companion animals, livestock and potentially also to wildlife. So far this species in the US has not been found infected with human pathogens. There is still a lot we don't know about ALTs, so this free webinar will serve as an overview of what we do know about the biology, ecology, and vectorial capacity of this tick species?and how existing approaches for combating native ticks may either work or backfire on this species. The presenters will also discuss other invasive tick species in the US and the potential for additional ones to become established.
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Announcements

From our Team to Yours: COVID-19 Resources for Dairy Farmers

The South Central NY Dairy and Field Crops Team has compiled a list of articles on their blog that we think may be useful to dairy producers and their service providers as we all navigate the COVID-19 situation. Please stay safe and reach out to our team if you have questions or need help finding information. We are here to help with tools and resources to support all of the normal day-to-day dairy, livestock, and field crop management considerations, in addition to emerging topics related to COVID-19.

Do you have visitors or employees travelling outside of the state?

They might need to quarantine! In response to the high rates of COVID-19 happening in other parts of the country, the NYS Department of Health will be requiring anyone entering NY from restricted states to quarantine for 14 days. For essential farm laborers, this would involve an employee seeking COVID-19 diagnostic testing within 24 hours of entering the state, monitoring their temperature and symptoms while wearing a face covering in public spaces, and avoiding extended periods of time in public. The CAN continue to work while following proper protocols during this time. For more information, read this post from Cornell Agricultural Workforce Development or contact our Farm Business Management Specialist, Katelyn Walley-Stoll.



Dicamba Notice to Users, Distributors and Sellers - June 29, 2020

On June 3, 2020, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit vacated EPA's registration of three products containing the active ingredient dicamba, which effectively cancelled their federal registrations. The three products are: Xtendimax with Vaporgrip Technology, Engenia, and FeXapan.
On June 8, 2020, in response to the Court's decision, EPA issued a Cancellation Order for these three products. In light of the Court's decision associated with these registrations and the provisions of EPA's Cancellation Order to implement that decision, DEC is taking these actions:
1) Registrations - The registrations of the three products will be cancelled as of July 31, 2020 in accordance with the provisions of ECL Section 33-0713. Thirty days' notice will be provided to the registrants of these products.
2) Distribution or Sale - Distribution or sale of existing stocks of the three products shall be limited as follows:
• Distribution or sale by registrants is prohibited immediately, except for distribution for the purposes of proper disposal.
• Distribution or sale of products that are already in the possession of someone other than the registrant is permitted only for disposal or to facilitate return to the registrant or a registered establishment.
• Distribution or sale by commercial applicators is permitted to facilitate use no later than July 31, 2020.
3) Use - All use, including storage of open containers, is prohibited after July 31, 2020.
Questions about dicamba may be directed to pesticidecompliance@dec.ny.gov or ppr@dec.ny.gov or by calling 518-402-8727. 


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