Livestock

LivestockThe livestock industry in New York totals $2.4 billion. For livestock marketing, New York ranks 39th for cattle and calf production, 20th for egg production, 24th for chicken production excluding broilers, 30th for hog and pig production, and 25th for sheep and lamb production. Our Specialists are able to help livestock producers by offering research-based programming and individual consultations. 




Relevant Events

Marketing Workshop for Fiber Farmers and Fiber Artists

July 11, 2020
9:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Tick IPM #3: Asian Longhorned Tick IPM

July 13, 2020
11:00 am

CORE Pesticide Training & DEC Recertification Credits

Event Offers DEC Credits

July 14, 2020
9am-10:50am

Sow Selection - What Makes a Good Sow?

July 16, 2020
12:15 pm - 1:00 pm

CORE Pesticide Training & DEC Recertification Credits

Event Offers DEC Credits

July 21, 2020
6pm-7:50pm

Most Recent Livestock Content

Management of Drought on Pasture

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 9, 2020
Management of Drought on Pasture

SWNY is beginning to encounter very dry conditions, where precipitation has been isolated to pop-up showers and looking to the sky for rain has started to become the new normal. As of July 9, the US Drought Monitor, indicated that all of SWNY is abnormally dry. Just last week, only the eastern side of Steuben County was listed in this classification, and a week prior to that, the condition was isolated to the northeastern part of the state and Finger Lakes region. Dry conditions hit pastures hard. Proper forage management to ensure sustainable nutrition for livestock as well as vitality of the pasture should be a priority, especially if those pastures are a primary source of livestock feed. This article explores strategies for pasture and livestock, and was adapted from Doo-Hong Min, Michigan State University Extension and Derrell Peel, Oklahoma State University by Dr. Mike Baker.


Preparing Livestock Producers for Drought Conditions - Farmer Resources

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 9, 2020
Preparing Livestock Producers for Drought Conditions - Farmer Resources

As more of the region heads into abnormally dry conditions, it's important to keep in mind strategies to keep herds and flocks healthy, hydrated, and fed. Dr. Mike Baker has prepared a series of drought resources which can be found on the Beef Cattle Management page. Strategies to stretch forages, change numbers of stock, wean early, and keep health up with enhanced nutrition are all ways to ensure that your stock makes it through the drier times. This list contains articles covering various drought-related topics from livestock educators across the state.


Spreading Dogbane - A problematic weed in SWNY

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 6, 2020
Spreading Dogbane - A problematic weed in SWNY

Josh Putman, Field Crops Specialist with the SWNY Dairy, Livestock & Field Crops program recently ran across a plant in a hay field that had not been worked for a few years and was very difficult to identify. Pictures of the weed were sent to Cornell's Weed Ecology and Management Laboratory and correctly identified.  Spreading dogbaneApocynum androsaemifolium, is in the same family as milkweeds and swallowworts, and the same genus as hemp dogbane. This perennial plant is found in open, dry areas and in disturbed habitats throughout New York and most of the US and Canada.


Dicamba Notice to Users, Distributors and Sellers - June 29, 2020

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: July 1, 2020
Dicamba Notice to Users, Distributors and Sellers - June 29, 2020

On June 3, 2020, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit vacated EPA's registration of three products containing the active ingredient dicamba, which effectively cancelled their federal registrations. The three products are: Xtendimax with Vaporgrip Technology, Engenia, and FeXapan.

On June 8, 2020, in response to the Court's decision, EPA issued a Cancellation Order for these three products. In light of the Court's decision associated with these registrations and the provisions of EPA's Cancellation Order to implement that decision, DEC is taking these actions:

1) Registrations - The registrations of the three products will be cancelled as of July 31, 2020 in accordance with the provisions of ECL Section 33-0713. Thirty days' notice will be provided to the registrants of these products.

2) Distribution or Sale - Distribution or sale of existing stocks of the three products shall be limited as follows:

  • Distribution or sale by registrants is prohibited immediately, except for distribution for the purposes of proper disposal.
  • Distribution or sale of products that are already in the possession of someone other than the registrant is permitted only for disposal or to facilitate return to the registrant or a registered establishment.
  • Distribution or sale by commercial applicators is permitted to facilitate use no later than July 31, 2020.

3) Use - All use, including storage of open containers, is prohibited after July 31, 2020.

Questions about dicamba may be directed to pesticidecompliance@dec.ny.gov or ppr@dec.ny.gov or by calling 518-402-8727. 


Ecological Control of Pasture Flies

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: June 30, 2020
Ecological Control of Pasture Flies

Pasture flies are more than a mere nuisance; they can result in production losses on cattle, sheep, goats, and other pastured livestock. Around June, the weather is warm enough that so long as there's enough moisture around, the populations of these pests will explode. A robust control program is necessary to prevent these populations from getting out of control. While chemical controls may work now, the flies will build resistance over time. In this article, specialists from the South Central NY Dairy and Field Crops Team review the top three fly pests: face flies, horn files, and stable flies, as well as integrated pest management techniques of pastures and barns to help keep the populations low, thereby reducing the need for chemical control methods.


Determining the Finish of Market Lambs

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: June 24, 2020
Determining the Finish of Market Lambs

Consumers of lamb demand a high-quality product, and are willing to pay a premium price for it should it meet or exceed their expectations. This consideration is especially important for those farmers marketing directly to the consumer; there is no farm anonymity here, and the consumer will know exactly the quality they can expect from you. That said, regardless of if a farm is selling direct or selling to a larger processor, it is known that an animal that has the proper ratio of fat to muscle will have cuts with great flavor, juiciness, and tenderness. By selling quality lamb or young mutton, there is potential to charge a premium price if selling direct, getting paid a premium price if selling to a processor, and the potential to keep a direct market consumer coming back again and again. In this article, Livestock Specialist, Amy Barkley, outlines finishing determinations shared by the National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service (ATTRA).


URI Offers Free Fecal Egg Count Analyses to Assist New England Farmers

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: June 24, 2020
URI Offers Free Fecal Egg Count Analyses to Assist New England Farmers

The University of Rhode Island is offering free fecal egg count services to members of the National Sheep Improvement Plan (NSIP) who are looking to generate Estimated Breeding Values for parasite resistance and non-NSIP members living in NY state who have a history with problems with gastrointestinal nematodes. Producers must be able to obtain and ship fecal samples within 4 weeks of each other, and animals must not have been dewormed within 4 weeks of sampling. Samples will be accepted for analysis through September 30th, 2020. Please contact Holly Burdett or Dr. Katherine Petersson, University of Rhode Island at urisheepandgoat@etal.uri.edu to obtain appropriate fecal sampling and shipping instructions. Please include your name, farm name, mailing address, and whether an NSIP member. More information can be found here: https://web.uri.edu/sheepngoat/files/URI-NESARE-2020-FEC-Announcement-Final.pdf


NYSDOL Updates Guidance FAQ About NY Farm Labor Laws by Richard Stup

Last Modified: June 23, 2020
NYSDOL Updates Guidance FAQ About NY Farm Labor Laws by Richard Stup

Richard Stup with Cornell Agricultural Workforce Development shares updates on the guidance for NY farm labor laws. 

The New York State Department of Labor (NYSDOL) recently released a new set of frequently asked questions (FAQ) that address the 2019 Farm Laborer Fair Labor Practices Act (FLFLPA) and the recent changes to FLFLPA that were made in the New York budget process. Find the FAQ here: https://labor.ny.gov/immigrants/farm-laborers-fair-labor-practices-act/flflpa-frequently-asked-questions.pdf

Pay special attention to the set of questions under the heading "Coverage." This section includes NYSDOL's interpretation of who is a "farm laborer" and who is not. Be aware that being family doesn't just require the common definition of the concept. As question 6 indicates, to be defined as family also requires a certain sense of obligation to the business and that pay is not based on hours or days of work. The law is in effect now but NYSDOL continues to be prevented from enforcing it with respect to family members and other exempt employee by the temporary restraining order issued by a federal judge in Buffalo. This situation will likely continue until the lawsuit is resolved.

Cornell Agricultural Workforce Development and other industry organizations are continuing to seek information and clarification from NYSDOL about important details and questions that the new laws raise.


Poultry Processing Waste Management via Composting

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: June 18, 2020
Poultry Processing Waste Management via Composting

Now that the weather is finally consistently warm and pastures are lush, most producers of pastured broilers and ducks are harvesting their first flocks or beginning their flock rotation cycles. Those who are raising turkeys and geese are also getting ready to or have already placed their birds in preparation for the fall and winter holiday seasons. As the harvest windows for these birds arrive, producers processing their own birds or processing birds for others need to arrange for a way to dispose of the waste from processing. These waste products include blood, feathers, offal, heads, feet, rinse water, and cooling water and must be properly dealt with to reduce their environmental impact. Additionally, and fortunately, what we traditionally may see as waste products can go on to live a second life as nutrients for other crops on the farm though composting while eliminating the costs of having to pay for other disposal services. Livestock Specialist, Amy Barkley, explores the basics poultry processing waste composting in this article. More information on composting poultry processing waste, other butchery waste, and livestock mortalities can be found on the Cornell Waste Management Institute Website.


Characteristics of Determining Market Readiness of Finished Cattle

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: June 11, 2020
Characteristics of Determining Market Readiness of Finished Cattle

Regardless of how beef animals are finished, either by grass, grain, or a combination, market weight animals that are sent to the auction or processor should be finished properly. Finishing is the process where an animal is fed a high energy diet to help them put on intramuscular fat, resulting in desirable marbling, which leads to a juicer, more tender, and more flavorful cuts. These desirable quality characteristics result in higher prices at market and a better experience for consumers. Finishing looks different on a purebred steer vs a dairy cross or a heifer vs a steer, but regardless of an animal's genetic background, these animals all have characteristics which show that they are ready to go to market. This article reviews the characteristics of finishing as described in the Cornell Small Farms video,  "Determining Market Readiness of Finished Cattle", narrated by Dr. Mike Baker, found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HrF5aCEAI-0&feature=emb_title


Black Cutworm and True Armyworm Moth Captures and Weed Pressure in SWNY

Joshua Putman, Field Crops and Forage Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: June 4, 2020
Black Cutworm and True Armyworm Moth Captures and Weed Pressure in SWNY

This week, Field Crops Specialist, Josh Putman, with the Southwest NY Dairy, Livestock, and Field Crops program scouted traps and fields throughout the region. In Avoca, NY, both moth species were present having 7 cutworm and 10 armyworm; not much larvae feeding was found. In Springville, NY 3 black cutworm and 3 armyworm were collected; we now have evidence of cutworm feeding on corn plants. According to Dr. Mike Stanyard of the NWNY Dairy, Livestock, and Field Crops team, it is important to be out scouting your fields now for pest damage and economic threshold that may require management. In addition, with the warm temperatures and increased day length, we are seeing an increase of weed pressure in our field crop production systems. Summer annual weeds compete for sunlight, nutrients and water. Don't let these pests rob your crop yields!


Dung Beetles Aid in Reducing Flies and Gastrointestinal Parasites in Pastures

Amy Barkley, Livestock Specialist
Southwest New York Dairy, Livestock and Field Crops Program

Last Modified: June 4, 2020
Dung Beetles Aid in Reducing Flies and Gastrointestinal Parasites in Pastures

Dung Beetles Aid in Reducing Flies and Gastrointestinal Parasites in Pastures, by Ken Wise, Dr. Mike Baker, and Jaime Cummings

Dung beetles may be unassuming members of pasture ecology, but are excellent managers of nutrients and pasture parasites. Given the right populations and conditions, entire manure pats can be stored and consumed by these insects in 36-48 hours. Under ideal conditions, they can control 95% of horn flies, and not only compete with horn flies, but also gastrointestinal parasites for the manure in the pats. That said, many commonly used pasture pesticides, both internal and external, have active ingredients which have the unintended consequence of being detrimental to dung beetles. In this newly published article, Ken Wise, Livestock and Field Crops IPM Extension Educator, reviews ways to increase dung beetle populations, those pesticides which are less toxic to dung beetle populations, and lists various feed-through insecticides. The article in its entirety can be found here: https://ecommons.cornell.edu/bitstream/handle/1813/69933/dung-beetles-FS-NYSIPM.pdf?sequence=2&isAllowed=y






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Upcoming Events

Food Industry Virtual Office Hours

July 9, 2020
4pm-5pm

Food Industry Virtual Office Hours

Thursday, July 9, 2020 | 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm (EDT)

Join us for our weekly Q&A and facilitated discussions during our Food Industry Virtual Office Hours to address questions on COVID-19. Speak directly to subject matter experts in sanitation, epidemiology, microbiology, virology, food safety culture, business continuity and the food safety of dairy foods, fresh fruits and vegetables, and processed foods and beverages.

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Marketing Workshop for Fiber Farmers and Fiber Artists

July 11, 2020
9:00 AM - 11:30 AM

Join Laura Biasillo from Broom County Cooperative Extension for a morning of discussion on marketing fiber on July 11th from 9:00AM - 11:30AM. This workshop includes the topics of marketing strategies, how to conduct market research, creating a plan to reach customers, and networking with local fiber farmers and makers. The workshop will be held over Zoom and will be $20 to attend. More about this event and the registration link can be found here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/localfiber-marketing-workshop-tickets-90854071975
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Tick IPM #3: Asian Longhorned Tick IPM

July 13, 2020
11:00 am

The Asian longhorned tick (ALT) is a threat to companion animals, livestock and potentially also to wildlife. So far this species in the US has not been found infected with human pathogens. There is still a lot we don't know about ALTs, so this free webinar will serve as an overview of what we do know about the biology, ecology, and vectorial capacity of this tick species?and how existing approaches for combating native ticks may either work or backfire on this species. The presenters will also discuss other invasive tick species in the US and the potential for additional ones to become established.
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Announcements

From our Team to Yours: COVID-19 Resources for Dairy Farmers

The South Central NY Dairy and Field Crops Team has compiled a list of articles on their blog that we think may be useful to dairy producers and their service providers as we all navigate the COVID-19 situation. Please stay safe and reach out to our team if you have questions or need help finding information. We are here to help with tools and resources to support all of the normal day-to-day dairy, livestock, and field crop management considerations, in addition to emerging topics related to COVID-19.

Do you have visitors or employees travelling outside of the state?

They might need to quarantine! In response to the high rates of COVID-19 happening in other parts of the country, the NYS Department of Health will be requiring anyone entering NY from restricted states to quarantine for 14 days. For essential farm laborers, this would involve an employee seeking COVID-19 diagnostic testing within 24 hours of entering the state, monitoring their temperature and symptoms while wearing a face covering in public spaces, and avoiding extended periods of time in public. The CAN continue to work while following proper protocols during this time. For more information, read this post from Cornell Agricultural Workforce Development or contact our Farm Business Management Specialist, Katelyn Walley-Stoll.



Dicamba Notice to Users, Distributors and Sellers - June 29, 2020

On June 3, 2020, the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit vacated EPA's registration of three products containing the active ingredient dicamba, which effectively cancelled their federal registrations. The three products are: Xtendimax with Vaporgrip Technology, Engenia, and FeXapan.
On June 8, 2020, in response to the Court's decision, EPA issued a Cancellation Order for these three products. In light of the Court's decision associated with these registrations and the provisions of EPA's Cancellation Order to implement that decision, DEC is taking these actions:
1) Registrations - The registrations of the three products will be cancelled as of July 31, 2020 in accordance with the provisions of ECL Section 33-0713. Thirty days' notice will be provided to the registrants of these products.
2) Distribution or Sale - Distribution or sale of existing stocks of the three products shall be limited as follows:
• Distribution or sale by registrants is prohibited immediately, except for distribution for the purposes of proper disposal.
• Distribution or sale of products that are already in the possession of someone other than the registrant is permitted only for disposal or to facilitate return to the registrant or a registered establishment.
• Distribution or sale by commercial applicators is permitted to facilitate use no later than July 31, 2020.
3) Use - All use, including storage of open containers, is prohibited after July 31, 2020.
Questions about dicamba may be directed to pesticidecompliance@dec.ny.gov or ppr@dec.ny.gov or by calling 518-402-8727. 


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